WikiLeaks trial focuses on Guantánamo detainee assessments

 
 
US Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is escorted out of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., United States, on June 4, 2013,  the second day of his court martial. Manning is charged with indirectly aiding the enemy by sending troves of classified material to WikiLeaks. If convicted, he could be ordered to serve life in prison.
US Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is escorted out of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., United States, on June 4, 2013, the second day of his court martial. Manning is charged with indirectly aiding the enemy by sending troves of classified material to WikiLeaks. If convicted, he could be ordered to serve life in prison.
PATRICK SEMANSKY / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Associated Press

The court-marshal of an Army private who sent troves of classified documents to WikiLeaks is turning to information gathered from Guantánamo Bay detainees.

Pfc. Bradley Manning’s trial enters its sixth day Wednesday at Fort Meade, near Baltimore.

Prosecutors plan to present evidence about more than 700 Guantánamo detainee assessment briefs the former intelligence analyst has acknowledged leaking in March 2010. WikiLeaks published the documents on its website a month later.

The Washington Post reported that they revealed details about the movements of al-Qaida leaders during 2001.

Manning has said he didn’t consider the reports important from an intelligence or national security standpoint but hoped they would have historical value.

He has pleaded not guilty to a charge that he stole the documents from a U.S. Southern Command database.

Read more Guantánamo stories from the Miami Herald

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