Interior design

Give your laundry room a makeover

 

Washington Post News Service

How is it that one of the most-used rooms in many homes is also one of the most neglected? This spring-cleaning season, take some time to set up your laundry room so that washing and drying aren’t such a chore. Paint, decorate and organize, and it will become a room you’ll want to spend some time in. (And if you have a laundry room, you will spend time there: The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that Americans wash 400 loads of laundry a year.)

And while you’re at it, reeducate yourself on stain-fighting and garment-cleaning essentials to make your work as enjoyable as your space. “There is something to be said for the knowhow of our grandmother’s generations,” says Gwen Whiting, one of the co-founders of the Laundress, a New York laundry products company and washing service (she recommends Ellen Sandbeck’s Organic Housekeeping and the Laundress’s Web site, www.thelaundress.com). “They really knew about the fabrics, steps and good elbow grease. The only difference today are machines and more sophisticated soap ingredients.”

Of course, it’s those specialty detergents and cleaning tools that are clogging up laundry rooms in the first place, so we found a collection of hampers, bins, hooks and other supplies to wrangle everything in an orderly fashion.

“With the proper tools,” says Sabrina Soto, a designer and HGTV host, “your laundry room is bound to stay neat and clutter-free.”

•  Get Organized

“Detergents and cleaning supplies can be emptied into matching jars or bottles for uniformity, making your space look fun and orderly,” Soto says. Clear glass canisters let you know when supplies are low ($5-$20, www.crateandbarrel.com).

As laundry products become more and more specialized, you might find that you have more and more products to organize. “Years ago, it was just a laundry product,” says Nancy Brock, senior vice president of education for the American Cleaning Institute. “Today it’s a laundry product for someone that may have sensitive skin issues. . . . We’re looking for things that make our life easier, better, healthier.”

Label jars of specialty soaps and detergents with chalkboard sticker labels. Soapstone chalk on self-adhesive vinyl labels will wipe clean with a wet cloth ($10, www.crateandbarrel.com).

Place products that are most frequently used at a reachable level. And, Soto suggests, use a bin or storage caddy, such as a Vinea storage basket, to avoid getting scum and residue on shelves and other surfaces ($12-$35, www.organize.com).

Among the essentials that the Laundress’ Lindsey Boyd lists for a well-organized laundry room are a hand-washing sink or tub, hampers, drying racks, hangers, mesh washing bags, a steamer, trash cans and “a nice, clean work table.” She has a bar-height Ikea table for her laundry. For something similar, try Ikea’s Utby stainless steel table ($199, www.ikea.com).

•  The Just-Right Hamper

Probably the most crucial part to getting your laundry organized is finding the right hamper for your needs. A four-bag commercial laundry sorter is good for separating laundry for a family of four or for separating out darks, lights, hand-washables and dry-clean-only clothes ($78, www.organizeit.com).

For another way to separate colors, try monogram canvas hampers by Portland, Ore.’s Beckel Canvas marked “dark” or “light.” Or give each family member a hamper with his or her own name (Mini, $32; Regular, $38, www.thelaundress.com).

Dealing with laundry-day backups? Steele’s rolling canvas laundry cart will keep piles of waiting dirty clothes off the floor. It’s part of Crate and Barrel’s new Clean Slate line ($135, www.crateandbarrel.com).

In smaller spaces, Soto says to consider multifunctional pieces, such as the double sorter with ironing board from Target’s new Threshold line, which gives you space to sort, treat and iron clothing ($60, www.target.com).

If you live in a townhouse with lots of stairs, you want hampers with handles. And to make schlepping those hampers up and down the stairs fun (or at least look like fun), use See Jane Work’s tall canvas bin with its chevron pattern in green, pink or gray. Reinforced handles make carrying easier ($90, www.seejanework.com).

•  Hang It Up

“Keep your floors clean by hanging items like vacuums, brooms, dustpans and mops,” Soto says. The white Elfa utility laundry and cleaning center provides a shelf for products and plenty of hooks for hanging small and large items ($225, www.containerstore.com).

And whether your laundry room is closet-size or palatial, “take advantage of every corner,” Soto says. A retractable clothesline disappears when not in use and expands up to 94 inches when needed ($12, www.containerstore.com).

Yes, you’ll need hangers or clothespins for line drying, but we found clothespins with an unexpected purpose. The Good Home Co.’s scented clothespins in Lavender, Beach Days, Pure Grass, Line Dried or Cedar will freshen up a drawer of newly laundered clothes, a gym bag or even a box of winter clothes ($12, www.goodhomestore.com).

•  Make It Your Happy Place

It makes sense: If you want a happy laundry room, then decorate with “something that makes you happy,” Whiting says. A brightly colored ironing board cover might make the dreaded chore of ironing cheerier ($24, www.etsy.com).

Don’t underestimate the power of white to keep a space calm. Even accessories such as the Container Store’s Superior white wood hangers bring serenity to chaotic utility rooms — or cluttered closets ($10-12, www.containerstore.com).

Keep the family socks and your sanity in check with the lost socks rack. Nine clips will hold onto lonely socks until you find their mates and will bring the room a touch of whimsy ($65, www.atwestend.com).

Read more Home & Garden stories from the Miami Herald

  •  
The Sahara fire table from Oriflamme.

    Outdoor living

    Fire tables are the newest in outdoor furniture

    Fire bowls were a great idea; they were just a little low to the ground and not especially attractive. Well, that has changed.

  •  
This convex mirror could be 200 years old or it could have been made much later.

    Treasures

    Convex mirror antique or just a family heirloom?

    Q: We have a convex mirror that has been in our family well over 50 years. There is some damage to the frame but the mirror itself is in good condition. The mirror is heavy and the frame is made of wood. What can you tell us about our mirror?

  •  
Michael Peter Balzary, the musician better known as Flea, has listed his home in Los Angeles’ Griffith Park area for $6.8 million.

    Hot Property: Los Angeles

    Ellen sells trophy home to tech billionaire

    Ellen DeGeneres has sold the A. Quincy Jones-designed Brody House on Los Angeles’ Westside to Napster co-founder Sean Parker for $55million in an off-market deal.

Miami Herald

Join the
Discussion

The Miami Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

The Miami Herald uses Facebook's commenting system. You need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment. If you have questions about commenting with your Facebook account, click here.

Have a news tip? You can send it anonymously. Click here to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Miami Herald and el Nuevo Herald.

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

  • Marketplace

Today's Circulars

  • Quick Job Search

Enter Keyword(s) Enter City Select a State Select a Category