Broward County

Police: Pembroke Pines woman escapes from abductor’s rape fantasy

 

cteproff@MiamiHerald.com

When Sayyid Khan woke up Tuesday morning, he decided it was time he fulfill a lifelong fantasy: to kidnap and rape a woman he didn’t know.

The 20-year-old Miramar man grabbed a large knife, a pellet gun, duct tape and gloves, dressed in dark clothing and went for a drive to find his victim, said Pembroke Pines police spokesman Capt. Al Xiques.

When he spotted a potential victim at a stop light, he followed her home. When she got out of her car, he blocked her path and pointed a gun at her.

The woman screamed.

The man ordered her into his ’94 Buick.

Fearing for her life, the 22-year-old woman did as she was told — but her screams attracted the attention of her brother.

Aniceto Ladislao ran out of their Pembroke Pines home to find the man holding his sister at gunpoint.

The man then turned the gun — which was covered with a white plastic bag — on Ladislao, but managed to get the woman in the car and drive off, according to the police report.

Ladislao memorized what he could see of the car’s license tag and called police.

“Her brother’s keen ability to provide us with information really helped us in this case,” said Xiques.

The car sped off, driving north on Interstate 75.

“The victim was pleading with the defendant to let her go,” the arrest report reads.

For the next several hours, the woman was put through a terrifying ordeal, as her abductor alternately ordered her to cover her eyes with gray tape, held his weapon to her face, and told her he was going to have sex with her.

With the gun and knife in his lap, Khan drove to King’s Manor Mobile Home Park, in the area of State Road 84 and Flamingo Road in Davie, police said. He raised the blade, giving the woman the idea he was going to stab her. He forced her into the back seat of the Buick, and, afraid she could still see through the tape, put more tape across her eyes.

He tried to take off her sweater, but the woman fought back.

Khan then held the knife to her nose, police said.

She eventually succumbed and lay on her side, in a fetal position. He pulled her body against his.

But she wasn’t giving up that easily.

She grabbed the gun — which was later determined to be a gas pellet gun — and tried to fire, but it didn’t.

That’s when she flung open the rear passenger door and ran, hiding in the landscaping. She pulled the tape from her eyes, and using her own cell phone, called 911.

Meanwhile, Pembroke Pines police were looking for the car her brother had described: a white, older-model, four-door Buick with “IB4” in the tag.

Ladislao had also given police a description of the man who’d abducted his sister: between 18-25 years old, thin, with a thin mustache and hair on his chin and a hoodie.

Surveillance video from the woman’s gated community gave even more information.

Pembroke Pines police and the Florida Department of Law Enforcement tracked Khan down at his Miramar home.

They were waiting at the home when he arrived, Xiques said.

Police said they spotted the tape, gloves and a large knife in plain view.

According to Pembroke Pines police, he admitted to planning and committing the kidnapping.

“It was like he was proud of his actions,” said Xiques. “He was bragging about it.”

Khan remained in Broward’s main jail Wednesday facing armed kidnapping, armed attempted sexual battery, aggravated battery with a deadly weapon, two counts of aggravated assault with a firearm and a battery charge.

Xiques had praise for the intended victim:

“Thanks to [her] quick wit and fighting spirit, she was able to get away.”

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