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Creativity at a spring home show

 

Associated Press

On New York’s Pier 94, this spring’s Architectural Digest Home Design Show was a chance for professionals and armchair decorators to see a sampling of what’s state-of-the-art in everything from appliances and room finishes to, well, art.

Premium kitchen and bath manufacturers deployed exhibit teams and chefs at the late March show to display the finishes and features of high-end equipment.

But big companies making big things gave way to what’s often the most intriguing area of the Architectural Digest show: the “MADE” wing of juried galleries, where artists and artisans display their creativity. This year, there were some fun, quirky pieces attracting passers-by and buyers.

At Wild Chairy, Andrea Mihalik recycles vintage chairs into functional art using bold combinations of textiles, and embellishments like organza petals or laced grommets. (www.wildchairy.com)

Fiyel Levent turned a series of intricate pen and ink drawings into laser-cut paper and brass table lamps evocative of Noguchi and Asawa. (www.interieurs.com; www.re-surface.net, www.fiyellevent.com)

John Eric Byers carved hardwood cylinders to resemble hammered metal, then blackened them and clad the ends in gold leaf to make a striking series of tables. (www.johnericbyers.com)

And Clark Sorensen got attention with his handmade porcelain urinals (”inspired by nature – and the call of it”) shaped like seashells and flowers. (www.clarkmade.com)

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