A Fork on the Road

Colombian hotdog joint caters to late-night Brickell crowd

 

If you go

Place: D-Dog House Restaurant & Bar

Address: 50 SW 10th St., Miami (across from Mary Brickell Village)

Contact: 305-381-7770, d-doghouse.com

Hours: 11:30 a.m.-2 a.m. Monday-Wednesday, until 5 a.m. Thursday-Saturday, until midnight Sunday

Prices: Hot dogs $5.99-$9.99, burgers $8.99-$9.99, wings $7.99-$10.99, corn bowl $6.99

F.Y.I. Dogs on leashes get a free bowl of Pedigree dog food.


Appetizer

Colombian-Style Wings

This recipe, adapted from mycolombianrecipes.com, is great served with salsa, hot sauce, or guacamole.

2 dozen chicken wings, patted dry with paper towels

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 cup beer

5 scallions, chopped

6 garlic cloves, chopped

1 large onion, chopped

1 tablespoon ground cumin

Place wings in a bowl and season with salt and black pepper to taste. Place oil, beer, scallions, garlic, onion and cumin in a blender and process until smooth. Pour marinade over the wings, tossing to coat, and refrigerate at least 3 hours.

Heat oven to 400 degrees. Lay wings in a single layer on baking sheets. Bake 30 minutes, until skin is crisp. Makes 24 wings.

Per wing: 115 calories (66 percent from fat), 8.3 g fat (2.2 g saturated, 3.4 g monounsaturated), 38 mg cholesterol, 9 g protein, .2 g carbohydrates, 0 g fiber, 36mg sodium.


lbb75@bellsouth.net

What you put on a hot dog reflects where you come from, and for Colombians, it is lots of sauces and potato chips.

D-Dog House is a small bar and restaurant in Brickell with brick walls, tables that light up in colors and an iPad menu for ordering. Burgers, chicken wings, empanadas, salads and bowls of corn kernels (maicito) smothered in melted mozzarella round out the menu.

Owner Sean Raee is of Iranian descent and grew up in Los Angeles. He runs an import-export electronics company with his Colombian wife, Monica, who is from Medellin. Monica’s son, Camilo Gonzalez, manages the place during the week, and his best friend, Jonnathan Petote, does weekend duty.

A perro caliente vendor in Bogota started the trend of crazy hotdog toppings in the 1980s to appeal to people leaving nightclubs. Here, the Colombian is a Nathan’s Famous beef dog wrapped in a strip of bacon, tucked in a soft bun and blanketed with oozing cheese, coleslaw, green salsa, pink mayo-ketchup sauce, pineapple jam and crushed potato chips topped with two hard-cooked quail eggs speared on a toothpick.

The Mexican has jalapeño jack cheese, guacamole and pico de gallo. The Californian comes with chili, Cheddar and sweet onions, and the Choripan has chorizo sausage, salsa, and melted cheese. Hebrew National, Vienna beef (for the Chicago) and tofu dogs are available.

To put the double D in the name, get two dogs in a bun. The Salchipapa is a basket of fries topped with sliced hotdogs, good with a Shipyard Pumpkin Head microbrew or sweet Postobon apple soda at this hot dog heaven.

Linda Bladholm is a Miami food writer and personal chef who blogs at FoodIndiaCook.com.

Miami Herald

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