Screen gems: What’s ahead in movies and on TV for the week of April 21

 

Big screen

Opening Friday

Pain and Gain (R): Michael Bay ( Transformers) takes a break from movies about giant robots to direct this pitch-black comedy, based on a true story, about three Miami bodybuilders (Mark Wahlberg, Dwayne Johnson and Anthony Mackie) who attempt to a kidnap a wealthy businessman. Then things start going way, way wrong.

The Big Wedding (R): Robert DeNiro and Diane Keaton play a divorced couple who must pretend they are still married for the sake of their adopted son’s marriage. Susan Sarandon, Topher Grace, Katherine Heigl, Robin Williams and Amanda Seyfried round out the starry cast.

Arthur Newman (unrated): Colin Firth stars as a desperate man who fakes his own death in order to reboot his life. Then he meets a woman (Emily Blunt) who happens to be doing the same thing.

Mud (R): Director Jeff Nichols’ follow-up to Take Shelter centers on a fugitive (Matthew McConaughey) hiding out in Arkansas who relies on the help of two boys to reunite with his girlfriend (Reese Witherspoon).

Rene Rodriguez

Small screen

All The President’s Men Revisited (8 p.m. Sunday, Discovery): If you’ve been longing to see people like Jon Stewart and Rachel Maddow wallow in beating-a-dead-horse nostalgia for Watergate, this is the show for you.

Rectify (9 p.m. Tuesday, Sundance Channel): Aden Young ( The Starter Wife) plays a convicted rape-murderer whose conviction is set aside 19 years later by DNA evidence. And, in this new series, it turns out a lot of people aren’t too pleased to see him coming home.

Burger Land (10 p.m. Monday, Travel Channel): Hamburger addict George Motz prowls America looking for the best burger joints — and this week, he hits Miami. How do Latin-influenced burgers like the Cuban frita stack up against the brawny beef from the U.S. heartland? Is this going to be our worst humiliation since the whole hanging-chad debacle? For more detail, see page 1M.

Citizen Hearst (8 p.m. Tuesday, Bio): When a photographer wired publisher William Randolph Hearst that his assignment in Cuba was a wild goose chase, that there was no war there, Hearst shot back: “You furnish the pictures and I’ll furnish the war.” Supposedly, anyway. Even if that story’s not true, it catches the spirit of the wild ride that Hearst’s knife-clenched-in-teeth journalism took the country on in the early 20th century. This documentary takes a look at the newspaper buccaneer who makes Rupert Murdoch look like a Disney cartoon.

Glenn Garvin

Miami Herald

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