5 free things: Salt Lake City

Save money when you’re off the slopes

 

Associated Press

Utah’s internationally-acclaimed ski resorts are the main reason people visit Salt Lake City in the winter, but there are plenty of fun, free and interesting things to do in Salt Lake City while in the area and other times of year. Here’s a sampling:

•  Temple Square: Utah’s most-visited landmark, the granite-towered Temple Square invokes the mystery of Mormonism. The 35-acre square is the worldwide headquarters of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and features the church’s sacred temple, one of the world’s largest genealogy libraries and spectacular gardens. The square is open every day from 9 a.m.- 9 p.m., and free tours are available in 30 different languages. Female church missionaries are happy to answer any questions.

The sacred temple — built over 40 years from 1853 to 1893 — is closed except to all but the most devoted churchgoers with a wallet pass. The temple is considered sacred to church members. At the Family History Library, genealogists will help you track down your family roots free of charge. The gardens within the square feature 250 flower beds with more than 700 different types of plants. They are redesigned every six months.

If you visit on a Thursday evening, you can catch the Mormon Tabernacle Choir rehearsing at 8 p.m. in the historic Tabernacle.

•  City Creek Center: Built for a reported $1.6 billion by the Mormon church to revitalize downtown Salt Lake City, it’s the country’s most modern outdoor shopping plaza. It has a trout stream meandering through the center and retractable roofs that keep the place warm during winter. Just don’t call it a “mall,” a sacrilege to the architects.

The shopping complex spans two city blocks and has outdoor walkways, plazas, fireplaces and metal sculpture. Waterfalls and fountains dot the village-like development, which includes condominiums and is joined by a pedestrian bridge over Main Street. All of the 100 or so shops and restaurants are closed on Sundays with the exception of two restaurants: Cheesecake Factory and Texas de Brazil.

•  Downtown light rail: Built with the 2002 Winter Olympics in mind, Salt Lake City’s light-rail network is free for passengers within downtown. Riders can get to and from major attractions such as Temple Square, City Creek Center, Salt Lake City Library, Energy Solutions Arena and the Gateway for free. An extension leading to the airport is expected to open this month, but trips on that section will cost riders.

•  Salt Lake City Library: Making this library more than a place to read was the goal of renowned architect Moshe Safdie. “My ambition was for it to be the best library in the world,” he said.

Safdie designed a six-story crescent of concrete and glass with vaulted ceilings, a place that invites people to linger. It has a cafe, shops, high-speed Internet connections, art exhibits that turn over every six weeks, film lectures and occasional live music.

The $65 million building, with a roller-coaster look, has a 360-degree view of the city and mountains and a rooftop garden. A curving ramp — the library’s signature outdoor feature — winds up to the garden.

•  Utah Museum of Contemporary Art: Recently ranked Utah’s best museum, it’s a four-time recipient of funding from the Andy Warhol Foundation. The museum is now featuring an exhibit called Analogital, which looks at art forms that have emerged during the culture’s conversion from film grain to computer pixel. It features artists such as Eva and Marco Mattes and Christian Jankowski.

The second Saturday of each month the museum hosts a free family arts event in which children and parents are led through creative art projects by trained artists. The museum has a gallery devoted to local artists, and an artist-in-residency program that allows artists to hone their craft while gaining inspiration from the art around them.

Visitors can see most of the works in 30 minutes, but museum spokeswoman Sarina Ehrgott recommends an hour so that people can take the time to spend time and understand each piece. “It’s really quite thought-provoking if someone were to take the time,” Ehrgott said.

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