Doing battle

Scientists seek ways to control termite population

 

Sun Sentinel

The coneheads are about to swarm.

A ravenous Caribbean termite with a pointy head — hence the name — is awaiting the start of rainy season to send out clouds of winged colonists to found new nests, threatening to spread the species beyond its square-mile foothold in Dania Beach.

The termite, formally known as Nasutitermes corniger, first turned up in Dania Beach in 2001, most likely in wood pallets arriving at a nearby marina from the Caribbean.

The agriculture department plans a public relations campaign in the coming months to alert residents beyond the borders of the termite’s known range. To read the full story, click here.

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