Showtime: Atlanta

Civil rights exhibit at Emory

 

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Amid the scores of photographs in an exhibit chronicling the history of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference are two that — at first glance — don’t seem to fit.

The black-and-white photographs are of small children in Vietnam.

That’s the beauty of the exhibit, And the Struggle Continues: The Southern Christian Leadership Conference’s Fight for Social Change, at Emory University’s Robert W. Woodruff Library, said Sarah Quigley, co-curator and a former SCLC project archivist.

The photos are displayed with a copy of a draft agreement between the SCLC and the government of Vietnam to establish an orphanage to help the children fathered by American troops.

“These are records that had never before been examined by scholars and tell a story about the SCLC that many people don’t know,” Quigley said.

It’s unfortunate, Quiqley said, that people know more about the SCLC’s work before the assassination of its co-founder, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., in April 1968, than after.

“The overreaching message of the exhibition is what did the civil rights movement focus on once voting rights were legally recognized and once the visible enemy was gone,” she said.

The exhibit of about 200 items, which runs through Dec. 1, includes information about the orgaization’s fight against the oppressive system of apartheid in South Africa, its work for equal access to health care and jobs, and Ralph David Abernathy’s April 1969 letter from a Charleston jail after he was arrested during a hospital workers strike.

•  And the Struggle Continues: The Southern Christian Leadership Conference’s Fight for Social Change runs through Dec. 1 at Emory University’s Robert W. Woodruff Library, Level 3; 540 Asbury Circle, Atlanta; 404-727-6873; web.emory.library.edu, click on “news and events.” Free admission.

Read more Travel stories from the Miami Herald

  •  
 <span class="cutline_leadin">A life in ruins:</span> Posters at the Hacienda Napoles ranch tell the story of slain Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar, once the head of the Medellin drug cartel.

    Colombia

    In Colombia, a playground with a past

    Wandering through a decaying doorless archway, I encounter a young boy crouching on a floor of broken tiles and rubble, beneath a framed newspaper front page from May 1984. “Lara B Assassinated,” the headline blares. “State of Siege.”

  •  
Passengers on the Harmony V go on a birding adventure in a pirogue on the Gambia River, home to more than 500 species of birds.

    Gambia

    Up the river in West Africa

    The radiant sun was starting its late-afternoon descent, and I was gliding on glassy water through a Gambian archipelago of tropical rain-forest islands in a brightly painted boat, a converted ferry with an upper deck and even a soft-drink bar. Propped against pillows with my feet up, I was as comfortable as Cleopatra on her royal barge.

  •  
A communal area of the lodge at the Bivvi in Breckinridge, Colo., which opened in December.

    Travelwise

    Wow. Are you sure this is a hostel?

    On my first night in Cleveland last year, I fell asleep spooning my backpack. I maneuvered my laptop beneath my pillow and leaned my favorite red boots against the wall by my feet. For the first time in more than a decade, I was overnighting in a hostel, and I didn’t know what to expect.

Miami Herald

Join the
Discussion

The Miami Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

The Miami Herald uses Facebook's commenting system. You need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment. If you have questions about commenting with your Facebook account, click here.

Have a news tip? You can send it anonymously. Click here to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Miami Herald and el Nuevo Herald.

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK



  • Marketplace

Today's Circulars

  • Quick Job Search

Enter Keyword(s) Enter City Select a State Select a Category