The travel troubleshooter

Budget had second thoughts about the discount it gave me

 

christopher@elliott.org

Q. I’d like to share my recent Budget car rental experience with you that has me committed to never doing business with them again.

A couple weeks ago I received a voicemail saying the Budget at the Kansas City airport would be charging me an extra $104 because an “internal audit” found they gave me too much of a discount. My receipt shows the $85 discount, which seemed right since there was an advertised discount.

So, they billed my credit card without my authorization, and then added in all the additional taxes and fees to bring the amount up to $104. I called Budget corporate and the franchise, but nobody would help fix the issue, even though I had a receipt to prove we “agreed” on the lesser amount.

I rent from Budget weekly, easily spending anywhere from $1,000 to $1,500 a month on their cars. The franchise doesn’t share information with the corporate office, so corporate is pretty much useless on the issue. Since there does not appear to be anything stopping them from charging customer credit cards at will, I refuse to ever do business with them again. Any advice?

Brandon Chase

Columbus, Ohio

Some of the most hotly debated cases I mediate are pricing errors — a fare or rate where a decimal point went astray — but I’d never come across a complaint where a discount had been withdrawn after a trip.

The Budget franchise in Kansas City should have caught any discounting error before your transaction, or at the very least, when you checked out. But leaving a voicemail weeks after your rental is highly unusual. It’s probably also illegal: Budget had a contract with you, which its retroactive re-billing breached, the way I see it.

I don’t understand why Budget corporate couldn’t help you. Isn’t that what the corporate office is for? By the way, who cares if Kansas City is a franchise location? Budget’s corporate structure is irrelevant to a customer, and the company shouldn’t use it as an excuse. Cheap hotel chains often do this, too, and you can’t let them get away with it.

Fortunately, you kept excellent records. You had proof of your final payment and of the discount. Had you tossed your receipt (which some customers do) this might have been a more difficult negotiation. Your appeal to Budget corporate yielded a $50 voucher, which was a good start.

I followed up with the company, asking why it revised your bill. It responded by reversing the charge.

Read more Travel stories from the Miami Herald

Miami Herald

Join the
Discussion

The Miami Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

The Miami Herald uses Facebook's commenting system. You need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment. If you have questions about commenting with your Facebook account, click here.

Have a news tip? You can send it anonymously. Click here to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Miami Herald and el Nuevo Herald.

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK



  • Marketplace

Today's Circulars

  • Quick Job Search

Enter Keyword(s) Enter City Select a State Select a Category