NRA to sponsor NASCAR Sprint Cup race in Texas

 

The Fort Worth Star-Telegram

The National Rifle Association, a touchstone for gun-rights advocates in the national debate about gun control, is putting its name on the NASCAR Sprint Cup race at Texas Motor Speedway in April.

The NRA 500 will be the name of the race scheduled for April 13 at the 1.5-mile track, part of a one-year deal announced Monday by speedway president Eddie Gossage.

"This isn't a political platform. This is a sports marketing opportunity," Gossage said. "Demographically, it's a perfect match."

The NRA sponsored a NASCAR Nationwide Series race in Atlanta last September, the "NRA American Warrior 300."

Gossage said this a one-year title sponsorship agreement with the NRA. He said that the track normally signs three-year deals with title sponsors, but that the NRA has options for the following seasons. He said the NRA approached the track last fall about a deal, but that it was not finalized until last week.

The announcement was made during Media Day at Texas Motor Speedway, where drivers Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Travis Pastrana and James Buescher met with reporters to promote the race weekend.

In a video message, NRA executive vice president Wayne LaPierre said, "The NRA 500 is the latest announcement in the long history of a growing partnership between the NRA, Speedway Motorsports and the NASCAR community."

Gossage expressed no concern about any potential negative effects from associating itself with a controversial organization.

Texas Motor Speedway said the NRA has contributed more than $500,000 to the track's Texas Chapter of Speedway Children's Charities. Speedway Motorsports, Inc. is the owner of TMS.

"I think it's great. I mean, the NRA is our core fan base," Stenhouse Jr. said. The NRA 500 is scheduled for 7 p.m. April 13, a Saturday prime-time start that makes it the season's first night race.

Read more Politics Wires stories from the Miami Herald

  •  
FILE - This May, 15, 2014 file photo shows the entrance of the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington. A leading Washington philanthropist is presenting an alternate plan to save one of the nation’s oldest museums in court hearings this week over whether to break up the trust from 1869 that established the Corcoran Gallery of Art and later its college.

    Philanthropist calls for saving Corcoran in court

    Wayne Reynolds, a leading Washington philanthropist, laid out an alternative plan in court hearings this week to save one of the nation's oldest museums and its college as a judge considers whether to break up the nearly 150-year-old Corcoran Gallery of Art.

  •  
Lois Lerner emails obtained from the House Ways and Means Committee are displayed in Washington, Wednesday, July 30, 2014.  A former IRS official at the heart of the agency's tea party controversial called Republicans "crazies" and more in newly released emails. Lois Lerner used to head the IRS division that handles applications for tax-exempt status. In a series of emails with a colleague in November 2012, Lerner made two disparaging remarks about members of the GOP, including one remark that was profane. Republican Rep. Dave Camp, who chairs the House Ways and Means Committee, released the emails Wednesday as part of his committee's investigation. Camp says the emails show Lerner's disgust with conservatives.

    GOP: Lerner emails show bias against conservatives

    Congressional investigators say this is why they want all of Lois Lerner's emails.

  •  
FILE - In this Jan. 8, 2004, file photo, then-Secretary of State Colin Powell speaks at a news conference in Washington at the State Department. A document circulating among White House staff says a Senate report on the CIA's interrogation and detention practices after the 9/11 attacks concludes that the agency initially kept Powell and some U.S. ambassadors in the dark about harsh techniques and secret prisons.

    State Dept: 'No American is proud' of CIA tactics

    The State Department has endorsed the broad conclusions of a harshly critical Senate report on the CIA's interrogation and detention practices after the 9/11 attacks, a report that accuses the agency of brutally treating terror suspects and misleading Congress, according to a White House document.

Miami Herald

Join the
Discussion

The Miami Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

The Miami Herald uses Facebook's commenting system. You need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment. If you have questions about commenting with your Facebook account, click here.

Have a news tip? You can send it anonymously. Click here to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Miami Herald and el Nuevo Herald.

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

  • Marketplace

Today's Circulars

  • Quick Job Search

Enter Keyword(s) Enter City Select a State Select a Category