Salad

Edamame are easy to find, easier to cook

 

Side dish

CELERY SLAW WITH EDAMAME

If you buy edamame frozen in the pod and uncooked, cook them in a medium saucepan of boiling water for 5 minutes. Drain and refresh them under cold water.

4 large, tender celery ribs

1 carrot, peeled

1 cup cooked edamame

2 green onions, white and tender green parts, thinly sliced

1/4 cup cilantro leaves, chopped

2 tablespoons coarsely chopped celery leaves

1 1/2 tablespoons rice vinegar

2 teaspoons canola oil

1/2 teaspoon celery seed

In a food processor or with a sharp knife, slice the celery and carrot as thinly as possible.

Put the celery and carrot in a bowl of ice water and crisp them for 15 minutes. Drain and pat them dry. Wipe out the bowl and return the celery and carrot to it.

Add the edamame, green onions, cilantro and celery leaves and toss well. In another bowl, whisk the rice wine vinegar with the oil and celery seed. Pour the dressing over the vegetables; toss and serve. Makes 6 servings.

Source: Bethany Thayer, MS, RD, for Heart Smart

Per serving: 104 calories (44 percent from fat), 5 grams fat (0.5 gram sat. fat), 9 grams carbohydrates, 6 grams protein, 72 mg sodium, 0 mg cholesterol, 3.5 grams fiber.


Detroit Free Press

Edamame (eh-dah-MAH-meh) are young, sweet, green soybeans harvested while still tender. Sometimes you will see them referred to as Japanese soybeans because “eda” means branch or twig and “mame” is bean in Japanese.

Look for fresh, shelled edamame in the produce section of grocery stores. They are also sold frozen, both in the pod and shelled.

The beans are used as a source of protein in many vegetarian recipes. A 1/2 cup of edamame contains about 8 grams of protein. It also has fiber, 4 grams per 1/2 cup serving.

You can eat edamame hot or cold. They have a very mild bean taste and, when cooked, a soft texture.

A popular way to enjoy edamame is to steam or boil them in their pods in salted water. Remove them and pop the beans out of their pods and then lightly salt them. The pods are not edible.

You can eat edamame for a snack or you can add them to casseroles and stir-fries or serve them as a side dish. Edamame is a great addition to a tossed salad.

Their soft texture makes them easy to process into a paste-like mixture for use in dips or pesto.

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