Cruises

Alaskan fleets are readying for biggest summer in years

 
 
Passengers on an Un-Cruise Adventures voyage kayak in Alaska.
Passengers on an Un-Cruise Adventures voyage kayak in Alaska.

Special to The Miami Herald

Major cruise lines and small-ship operators are beefing up their Alaska offerings this summer, giving vacationers more choices and promising to boost the passenger count above one million for the first time in four years.

Eleven major lines will be making cruises in the region in 2013, along with a number of small-ship operators. Holland America and Princess each will have seven ships sailing in the waters of the 49th state. Norwegian Cruise Line is bringing a third ship to the region, Oceania is returning to Alaska after a year’s absence, Celebrity is bringing its much-heralded Celebrity Solstice to Alaska, and several lines are stationing newer or recently renovated ships there.

All of which will give passengers not only more choices of ships and ship styles, but also of itineraries, departure dates and land options.

“We estimate total passengers in 2013 to be just over a million,’’ said John Binkley, president of the Alaska Cruise Association. That would mark the first time since 2009 that the passenger count passes the million mark.

That stronger interest in Alaska, however, may signal one drawback for prospective passengers: “We won’t see the rock-bottom deals of the past couple of years,’’ explained Erica Silverstein, feature editor of Cruise Critic.

As for all the negative publicity resulting from the fire and stranding of the Carnival Triumph, Silverstein predicts its impact on Alaska cruises, if any, is likely to be minimal. “Previous disasters have been found to impact first-time cruisers,” she said; most Alaska passengers have cruised before.

Silverstein said this year is also bringing more interest in cruisetours, cruises that include a land component and are especially popular in Alaska, where train rides and Denali National Park are strong draws.

“More than half of our [passengers] are on cruisetours,” said Lisa Syme, vice president commercial for Princess Cruises, which is the biggest cruise operator in Alaska. Both Princess and Holland America operate many land tours, and now Norwegian will offer such tours with its third Alaska ship.

Some of the changes major cruise lines are making this season:

•  Holland America is doubling the number of departures by its Amsterdam by changing from 14-night to seven-night sailings.

•  Princess will deploy the larger and recently remodeled Grand Princess to its Alaska sailings from San Francisco, replacing the Sea Princess.

•  Norwegian not only is bringing a third ship, the Norwegian Sun, to Alaska but also will make Gulf of Alaska cruises for the first time.

• Both ships Royal Caribbean will base in Alaska, the Radiance of the Seas and the Rhapsody of the Seas, are or will be renovated this season.

•  Celebrity is introducing a Solstice-class ship, the Celebrity Solstice, to Alaska for the first time.

Among the smaller ships offering Alaska cruises, the former InnerSea Discoveries and American Safari cruise lines are offering a variety of sailings under the company’s new name, Un-Cruise Adventures. With three yachts, three expedition vessels and a Victorian style steamer, the line offers active adventures and up-close explorations of nature and wildlife, as do most other small ships operating in Alaska. Safari Legacy, the Victorian steamer, joins the fleet in August to make a pair of cruises retracing Gold Rush history.

Other small-ship operators include American Cruise Lines, sailing in Alaska for the first time this year with its American Spirit. Alaska Dream Cruises is adding a third ship, the Baranof Dream, to join its Alaskan Dream and Admiralty Dream in its fleet. Lindblad Cruises has two ships, the National Geographic Sea Bird and National Geographic Sea Lion; and Glacier Bay Cruising has three vessels, the Wilderness Adventurer, Wilderness Discoverer and the Executive Explorer. All carry less than 100 passengers.

Here’s a summary of major ship sailings this season:

•  Carnival: Mostly seven-night roundtrip sailings from Seattle on the Carnival Miracle, which is replacing the Carnival Spirit this year.

•  Celebrity: Seven-night cruises on three ships — Celebrity Solstice will sail from Seattle; Celebrity Century from Vancouver; Celebrity Millennium between Vancouver and Seward.

•  Crystal: One nine-night cruise only.

•  Disney: Fifteen seven-night cruises on the Disney Wonder from Vancouver.

•  Holland America: Seven ships will make seven-night cruises from various ports — Amsterdam, Zuiderdam and Volendam from Vancouver, Oosterdam and Westerdam from Seattle, Statendam and Zaandam between Seward and Vancouver.

•  Norwegian: The line’s addition to its Alaska fleet, the Norwegian Sun, will make seven-night cruises between Vancouver and Whittier. The Norwegian Jewel and Norwegian Pearl both sail from Seattle.

•  Oceania: Returning to Alaska this year, the Regatta will make seven-, 10- and 14-night sailings, mostly between Vancouver and Seattle, with some roundtrips from Vancouver.

•  Princess: The line will have 124 Alaska sailings on seven ships this year — Grand Princess from San Francisco; Diamond, Sapphire, Island and Coral Princess ships between Vancouver and Whittier; Golden and Star from Seattle; Island and Sapphire also make one roundtrip each from Vancouver.

•  Regent: Seven Seas Navigator will sail mostly seven-nighters between Vancouver and Seward.

•  Royal Caribbean: Rhapsody of the Seas will operate seven-night cruises out of Seattle, Radiance of the Seas will sail seven nights between Vancouver and Seward.

•  Silversea: Silver Shadow will make 15 Alaska cruises, mostly seven nights between Vancouver and Seward.

Read more Cruises stories from the Miami Herald

Miami Herald

Join the
Discussion

The Miami Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

The Miami Herald uses Facebook's commenting system. You need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment. If you have questions about commenting with your Facebook account, click here.

Have a news tip? You can send it anonymously. Click here to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Miami Herald and el Nuevo Herald.

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK



  • Marketplace

Today's Circulars

  • Quick Job Search

Enter Keyword(s) Enter City Select a State Select a Category