A look at other universities that have been sanctioned by the NCAA for violations since 2010

 
WEB VOTE Who looks the worst amid the NCAA's investigation of the Miami Hurricanes program?

sdegnan@MiamiHerald.com

Central Florida (July 2012)

•  Summary of violations: Lack of institutional control, impermissible recruiting and extra benefits (involvement of third parties with prospects and student-athletes, that included more than $16,000 for travel expenses, cash payments, tuition and a computer for three prospects and two UCF athletes). Unethical conduct by athletic director (including lying during interviews with NCAA, per NCAA) and assistant football coach (lying to NCAA, per NCAA).

•  Summary of NCAA penalties: Five years of probation through February 2017. Postseason bans for 2012 football season and 2012-2013 men’s basketball season. Three-year show-cause order for men’s basketball coach. Limited off-campus recruiting for men’s basketball. Three-year show-cause order for athletic director. One-year show-cause order for assistant football coach. Reduction of five total and five initial football scholarships for three academic years. A limit of 11 men’s basketball scholarships (from 13 maximum) for three academic years. $50,000 fine. Vacation of all men’s basketball wins in which an ineligible student-athlete competed for the previous three seasons. Reduction in recruiters for football and basketball for two academic years. Several other recruiting restrictions.

Penn State (July 2012)

•  Summary of violations: Child sex-abuse scandal involving former defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky, who was sentenced to 30-to-60 years in prison and found guilty of 45 counts of child sexual abuse in molesting 10 boys over a 15-year period.

•  Summary of NCAA penalties: $60 million fine. Five-year probation. Four-year postseason ban. Can only give out 15 scholarships per year (usual amount is 25) over the next four years. Total scholarships limited to 65 per year over that span (usual amount is 85). Vacating all wins from 1998 to 2011 (career record of Joe Paterno will reflect vacated records).

South Carolina (April 2012)

•  Summary of violations: Impermissible recruiting (more than $8,000 cash, gift cards, entertainment), extra benefits and preferential treatment (athletes lived in local hotel for $15 a day; some were given loans for the fees) — primarily football related.

•  Summary of NCAA penalties: Three-years probation through April 26, 2015. Reduction of total football scholarships by three (from 85 maximum) during 2013-14 and 2014-15 academic years. Reduction of initial football scholarships by three (from 25 maximum) during those two academic years (self-imposed). $18,500 fine (self-imposed). Recruiting visits reduced in football and men’s and women’s track and field. One football assistant and one men’s basketball assistant withheld from off-campus recruiting and/or overall recruiting for a month each (self-imposed).

North Carolina (March 2012)

•  Summary of violations: Academic fraud, impermissible agent benefits, ineligible participation and a failure to monitor football program. Over three seasons, six football players competed while ineligible as a result of violations, and multiple student-athletes received benefits of more than $31,000. An assistant football coach was paid by a sports agent for access he provided to athletes. A tutor “constructed significant parts of writing assignments’’ for three football players — and provided more than $4,000 in benefits, including airfare and paying for parking tickets, to 11 football players. An assistant football coach lied, according to the NCAA, to NCAA investigators, among other infractions related to collecting money from outside income related to a sports agency. Also, a former student-athlete was deemed an agent runner during the NCAA investigation.

•  Summary of NCAA penalties: Three years of probation through March 11, 2015. Three-year show cause order for former assistant football coach, prohibiting any recruiting activity. Postseason ban for 2012 football season. Reduction of football scholarships by a total of 15 during three academic years. Vacation of wins during 2008 and 2009 seasons (self-imposed). $50,000 fine (self-imposed). Disassociation of former tutor and former student-athlete who served as agent runner (self-imposed).

Ohio State (December 2011)

•  Summary of violations: Failure to monitor, preferential treatment and extra benefits (eight football players received more than $14,000 in cash payments. Also, free and/or discounted tattoos and cash for memorabilia received by the players. One player received a loan and car discount. Former coach (Jim Tressel) concealed the violations and decided not to report them to Ohio State officials, the Big Ten or the NCAA. Following the Committee on Infractions hearing, the NCAA enforcement staff and Ohio State found more violations. They involved a booster providing nine football players with more than $2,400 in payments for work not performed.

•  Summary of penalties: Three years of probation through Dec. 19, 2014. Postseason ban for 2012 season, which includes conference championship game. Reduction of football scholarships from 85 to 82 through 2014-15 academic year. Vacation of all wins for 2010 season and 2011 Sugar Bowl (self-imposed). Forfeiture of $338,811 Big Ten revenue sharing for appearance in bowl game (self-imposed). Five-year show-cause order for Jim Tressel. Disassociation of the booster for 10 years (self-imposed). Disassociation of a former student-athlete for five years.

Southern Cal (June 2010)

•  Summary of violations: Spanned almost four years, according to NCAA, “primarily involving agent and amateurism issues for a former football student-athlete” (Reggie Bush) and a former men’s basketball student-athlete. Bush and stepfather and mother agreed to form partnership to form sports agency — then asked for financial and other assistance from the partners (benefits included several thousand dollars, a car, housing, washer and dryer, air travel, hotel lodging, transportation). Thus Bush competed while ineligible. Other violations by basketball player. Lack of institutional control, impermissible inducements, extra benefits, exceeding coach staff limits, and unethical conduct by an assistant football coach.

•  Summary of NCAA penalties: Four years of probation through June 9, 2014. Postseason ban for 2009-10 men’s basketball season (self-imposed). Postseason ban for 2010 and ’11 football seasons. One-year show-cause penalty for assistant football coach. Vacation of all wins in which Bush competed while ineligible (same for basketball player). Decrease of 10 scholarships for each of three seasons (2011-12 through 2013-14) for football, and of one for men’s basketball (2009-10 and 2010-11, self-imposed). Reduction of recruiting days by 20 in basketball (self-imposed) for 2010-11. $5,000 (self-imposed). Remittance of the $206,200 USC received for its participation in NCAA basketball tournament (self-imposed). Disassociation of Bush and former men’s basketball athlete. Prohibition of all non USC personnel, including boosters, from traveling on charters, attending football and basketball practices, having access to sidelines, or donating, etc.

Read more State Colleges stories from the Miami Herald

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