Curry

Jarred peppers the secret ingredient in easy, low-fat chicken curry

 

Main dish

Speedy and Light Chicken Curry

12-ounce jar roasted red peppers, drained

1 small yellow onion, chopped

1 cup chicken broth

1/2 cup light coconut milk

2 teaspoons curry powder

3 (3-inch) lengths fresh lemon grass

15-ounce can chickpeas, drained

1 cup grated carrots

1 3/4 pounds boneless, skinless chicken thighs

Cooked rice (optional)

In a blender or food processor, process bell peppers, onion, broth, coconut milk and curry powder until smooth.

Pour the sauce into a large, deep sauté pan over medium-high heat. Bring to a simmer. Use a rolling pin or meat mallet to lightly crush the lemon grass and add to the sauce. Stir in chickpeas and carrots. Nestle chicken thighs into the sauce, being sure the tops are covered. Reduce heat to maintain a simmer and cook, uncovered, 20 minutes.

Remove and discard the lemon grass. Serve over rice, if desired. Makes 6 servings.

Per serving: 320 calories, 110 calories from fat (34 percent of total calories), 12 g fat (4 g saturated, 0 g trans fats), 90 mg cholesterol, 23 g carbohydrate, 4 g fiber, 3 g sugar, 30 g protein, 600 mg sodium.


Associated Press

It didn’t seem too much to ask for. I wanted a coconut chicken curry that is fast, delicious and not loaded with fat. Turned out to be easier than I expected.

Let’s start with the sauce. The key is to make it rich and flavorful without resorting to the usual culprit — full-fat coconut milk. I considered light coconut milk, but have found curries made with it to be thin and uninspiring. Fat, after all, is yummy.

My solution was to start with a small amount of light coconut milk and doctor it up. Pureeing into it a jar of roasted red peppers and a small onion was just the trick. This provided the sauce with body as well as both sweet and savory flavors. A hefty dose of curry powder and some lemon grass added during cooking rounded it all out.

To cook, all I did was bring my sauce to a simmer in a large sauté pan, then add my chicken. To bulk out the recipe with good lean protein, I also added a can of chickpeas. I tasted it as it cooked and felt it was missing something sweet. But I wanted to avoid sugar if I could. So I tried added grated carrots. Perfect! More healthy veggies and just the right amount of natural sweetness.

While you could use boneless, skinless chicken breasts in this recipe, I prefer thighs. They have a richer flavor and don’t get tough the way breasts can.

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