Gadgets & Gizmos

Portable scanner doesn’t require a computer

 

Twitter.com/greggellman

The Doxie One portable scanner is computer-less and one of the easiest to work.

A push of a button scans photos, documents, receipts or just about anything you can feed it, from business cards to 8.5-by-15 inch papers.

You have several choices to power it up; the included AC wall power adapter or four AAA Ni-Mh rechargeable batteries.

Just insert the included 2GB SD memory card, where your scans will be stored. Third party companies such as Eye-Fi make wireless SD cards, which can be used to send your scans to a Mac, PC or even some tablets and smartphones.

To retrieve your scans you can insert the memory card in your computer or connect the included USB cord to your device. Output formats include JPEG, PDF and PNG files in both color and black and white.

A calibration sheet and a protect cover are included.

Scanning 4-by-6-inch images takes just 5 seconds each with a 300 DPI color resolution or about 8 seconds for a full document scan also at 300 DPI color.

This scanner is a great device for archiving that shoebox full of prints many of us don’t have time to deal with. Details: www.getdoxie.com $144

SOUND INVESTMENT

While trolling around the Ableplanet display at CES, I had a quick conversation with a big fan of its headphones. I agree: Every set I’ve tested from the company has been outstanding. That includes the latest, Ableplanet’s Musicians Choice.

Its padded over-the-ear cups are flexible and turn sideways for space-saving. As for the sound, which includes Linx Audio, when you consider the price ($89 at Ableplanet.com or $44 at Amazon) you’re getting a great deal.

, Linx Audio creates high frequency harmonics that enhance sound quality and speech clarity and increase the perception of loudness without increasing volume.

An in-line mic controls sound and music selections on Apple portable devices along with other smartphones and tablets.

Headphones come in 11 colors and include a soft pouch.

Details: www.ableplanet.com

LEADING THE PACKS

I tested the OGIO Renegade RSS backpack, which has more storage compartments than even someone like me needed to fill up, with a laptop, tablet, cables, accessories and gadgets.

Each pocket is easy to access and seems to lead to more compartments.

A unique design called Red Protection identifies the safest compartment. In this case it was the back of the pack, which I used for my 15-inch MacBook Pro, although a 17-inch would also fit. Pockets, zippers and padding seem to be everywhere and it rests comfortably on your back.

Another specific feature includes a crush-proof Tech Vault. The backpack’s higher cost is worth the protection it gives your expensive products. Details: www.ogio.com $149

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