Top Sesame Orange Salmon with warm bok choy salad

 

Main dish

Sesame Orange Salmon With Warm Bok Choy Salad

To cut the orange into supremes, slice off the bottom and the top. Stand the fruit on a cutting board with one of the cut sides down. Use a serrated knife to cut the peel and the pith away from the fruit, top to bottom, exposing the flesh. Then, holding the fruit in your hand, cut the orange segments away from the membrane. (The idea is to leave behind all of the membrane and white pith.)

For the salmon:

Finely grated zest and freshly squeezed juice of 1 large orange (1 teaspoon zest, about 1/4 cup juice)

1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil

1 teaspoon honey

Salt

Freshly ground pepper

Four 4-to-6-ounce salmon fillets, skinless if desired

2 teaspoons olive or peanut oil

For the salad:

1 pound bok choy, white stems cut into approximately 3/4-inch dice, leafy green parts cut into strips about 1 inch long and 1/2 inch wide

1 1/2 teaspoons olive or peanut oil

4 medium scallions, white and light-green parts, cut crosswise into thin slices (1/2 cup)

2 medium carrots, coarsely grated (1 cup)

Finely grated zest of 1 large orange (1 teaspoon)

2 oranges, peeled and cut into supremes (see note)

2 teaspoons honey

1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil

Salt

Freshly ground pepper

For the salmon: Combine the orange juice and zest, toasted sesame oil and honey in a shallow dish. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Add the salmon fillets and turn to coat completely; turn again after 10 minutes.

While the fish is marinating, start the salad: Steam the bok choy in a stove-top steamer in stages. First, steam the stems for 4 to 5 minutes, until tender. Remove the stems and add the bok choy leaves; cover and steam them for about 3 minutes, until wilted and tender.

Heat the oven to 350 degrees.

Heat the 1 1/2 teaspoons of olive or peanut oil in a deep nonstick 10-inch saute pan or skillet over medium-high heat. Add the scallions; cook for 1 minute, stirring. Add the carrot; cook, stirring, for 3 to 4 minutes, until the carrot is just getting tender. Add the orange zest, the orange segments, the steamed bok choy stems and leaves, the honey and toasted sesame oil; stir to combine. Season with salt to taste. Reduce the heat to medium and cook for 3 to 4 minutes, until the orange segments have warmed through. Turn off the heat.

To finish the fish, heat the 2 teaspoons of olive or peanut oil over medium-high heat in a nonstick, ovenproof saute pan or skillet large enough to hold all of the salmon pieces. Once the oil is hot, carefully add the salmon pieces, skin (or skinned) side up. Cook for 1 to 2 minutes, just long enough to form a nice crust. Use a wide, thin spatula to carefully flip the salmon pieces. Cook for 1 minute, then transfer the pan or skillet to the oven. Cook for 5 to 6 minutes or until the salmon is done to your liking.

Divide the bok choy and orange salad mixture among individual plates, piling it at the center of each one. Top each portion with a piece of the salmon. Serve warm or at room temperature. Makes 4 servings.

Per serving: 300 calories, 25 g protein, 18 g carbohydrates, 15 g fat, 3 g saturated fat, 60 mg cholesterol, 230 mg sodium, 4 g dietary fiber, 12 g sugar.


Special to The Washington Post

Fun, flavorful and appealing: Those three words pretty much sum up this dish. A quick marinade of orange and sesame lightly flavors the fish. The bok choy and orange salad (a play on the traditional Italian orange and fennel salad) provides a bright base on the plate.

Add a little rice and you’ve got dinner.

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