House GOP leaders say Senate has to make next move to avoid cliff

 

McClatchy Newspapers

House of Representatives leaders talked Wednesday and said they'd wait for the Senate to act on legislation to avert the fiscal cliff. House leaders said that once the Senate acts, they will consider whether to take up that measure.

The House , which has a Republican majority, in August passed a bill to extend all the Bush-era tax cuts, which expire at the end of the year, for one year. It has also approved legislation last week that's an alternative to the $109 billion in automatic spending cuts due to take effect Jan. 2.

The Democratic-run Senate this summer passed a measure to extend only tax cuts for individuals earning less than $200,000 and families making less than $250,000.

In a joint statement, House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, and his leadership team gave this report Wednesday:

"The House has acted on two bills which collectively would avert the entire fiscal cliff if enacted. Those bills await action by the Senate.

"If the Senate will not approve and send them to the president to be signed into law in their current form, they must be amended and returned to the House. Once this has occurred, the House will then consider whether to accept the bills as amended, or to send them back to the Senate with additional amendments.

"The House will take this action on whatever the Senate can pass, but the Senate first must act. The lines of communication remain open, and we will continue to work with our colleagues to avert the largest tax hike in American history, and to address the underlying problem, which is spending."

Read more Politics Wires stories from the Miami Herald

  •  
FILE - This March 14, 2013 file photo shows House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif., and House Democratic leaders speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. The House Republicans’ campaign committee raised almost $10 million in March and has $31.2 million banked to defend the party’s majority, according to financial reports filed Sunday. The National Republican Congressional Committee’s $21.2 million fundraising haul in January, February and March gave the group its best first-quarter showing since 2003. It also puts the committee roughly $8 million ahead of its fundraising at this point in 2012. From left to right are Democratic Campaign Committee Chairman Steve Israel, D-N.Y., House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer, D-Md., House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Democratic Caucus Chairman Xavier Becerra, D-Calif.

    GOP campaign committee has $31M to hold House

    The House Republican campaign committee raised almost $10 million in March and has $31.2 million banked to defend the party's majority, according to financial reports filed Sunday.

  •  
First lady Michelle Obama, left, walks with President Barack Obama, and daughters Sasha and Malia, both partially obscured, from the White House to a motorcade to attend Easter services on Sunday, April 20, 2014, in Washington. The first family attended services at the Nineteenth Street Baptist Church in Washington.

    Obama, family cause a small stir at Easter service

    President Barack Obama may have expected a quiet Easter, but his presence rallied a congregation eager to greet him and his family to the front of the church.

  •  
Retire U.S. Army Col. Conrad Reynolds participates in a debate between Republican Congressional hopefuls in Little Rock, Ark., Saturday, April 19, 2014. Three area seeking the GOP nomination in the race for Congress in Arkansas' 2nd district.

    3 vying for Republican nomination for House seat

    The three candidates seeking the Republican nomination for a central Arkansas congressional seat are running on vows to cut taxes and regulations in Washington, but split sharply on who would be the strongest candidate in this fall's election.

Miami Herald

Join the
Discussion

The Miami Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

The Miami Herald uses Facebook's commenting system. You need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment. If you have questions about commenting with your Facebook account, click here.

Have a news tip? You can send it anonymously. Click here to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Miami Herald and el Nuevo Herald.

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

  • Marketplace

Today's Circulars

  • Quick Job Search

Enter Keyword(s) Enter City Select a State Select a Category