A Fork on the Road

Globe-trotting chef goes organic in North Miami Beach

 

Main Dish

Pheasant Stir-Fry

This easy recipe is adapted from “The Top 100 Immunity Boosters” by Charlotte Haigh (Duncan Baird, 2005). Serve with sweet potatoes. Pheasant is available locally from buyexoticmeats.com, 786-245-5299.

2 pheasant breast halves, skinned and cut in large pieces

2 tablespoons sesame oil

10 portobello mushrooms, sliced

1 red bell pepper, cored and chopped

1 onion, finely chopped

2 teaspoons soy sauce

Heat the oil in a large skillet over low heat and fry the pheasant until browned. Increase the heat to high, add the mushrooms, pepper and onion and stir-fry for about 6 minutes until the vegetables are tender. Add the soy sauce and cook a few more minutes. Makes 2 servings.

Per serving: 331calories (48 percent from fat), 18 g fat (3.3 g saturated, 6.6 g monounsaturated), 66 mg cholesterol, 31 g protein, 12 g carbohydrates, 3.2 g fiber, 386 mg sodium.


If you go

What: Green House Organic Food Restaurant

Address: 3207 NE 163rd St., North Miami Beach

Contact: 305-949-6787, greenhousemiami.com

Hours: 5-11 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, 5 p.m.-midnight Friday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Sunday (all-day brunch).

Prices: Appetizers $15-$18, salads $15-$19, entrees $21-$45, desserts $12. Five-course brunch $79 including glass of champagne 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday. Three-course Chef’s Choice menu $59 including wine for guests seated before 7 p.m. weekdays.


lbb75@bellsouth.net

Never had purple truffle pizza or ostrich carpaccio with lavender-infused olive oil? Green House Organic Food in North Miami Beach is the place to try them along with a seasonal menu made with ingredients sourced from around the globe. The eclectic offerings range from mussels in soy milk to house-cured meats.

Chef Marcelo Marino’s roots are in Cordova, Argentina, but he grew up in Italy, Germany and Brazil as his pilot father was often transferred. He graduated from Le Cordon Bleu in New Hampshire and worked internationally as a chef and restaurant consultant before moving to South Florida, where he also teaches at Le Cordon Bleu in Miramar.

At Green House, his tender octopus is cooked sous-vide, then lightly grilled and served on a ginger-carrot coulis with pineapple foam. Brazilian moqueca is coconut seafood soup enriched with bright orange dende (palm oil).

Halibut comes in lobster sauce with kale and farotto (faro risotto). New Zealand lamb chops are enhanced with three-pepper jelly. The house salad has seven greens including maroon Lola Rosa lettuce and Malabar spinach with candied lemon zest and cocoa.

Dessert choices include confit heirloom tomatoes and apple strudel crumbs in strawberry “spaghetti” made from fruit gel topped with butternut Chantilly cream and Hawaiian smoked salt brittle.

Linda Bladholm is a Miami food writer and personal chef who blogs at FoodIndiaCook.com.

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