JOBS

South Florida’s hiring rebound nears a stall

 

Weak job growth and a wobbly unemployment rate left South Florida’s employment picture looking worse after a slow summer.

dhanks@MiamiHerald.com

South Florida’s employment rebound continues to sputter forward.

Early results from the region’s end-of-summer report card on hiring showed little progress, and some back steps. August brought continued job growth in Broward and Miami-Dade, but at a much slower pace than at the start of 2012. And the best measure of local unemployment, Miami-Dade’s seasonally adjusted jobless rate, dropped for discouraging reasons: fewer people in the labor force, rather than more people employed.

Statewide, the picture was similarly blah. Florida’s unemployment rate remained stalled at 8.8 percent, though the extra 23,200 payroll positions added since July was the second largest in the country.

The so-so results mirrored a national hiring report for August released two weeks ago, which showed sluggishness in a labor market that began the year at a much more bullish pace.

Miami-Dade’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate stood at 9.2 percent in August, down from 9.5 percent in July, according to the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics. That was despite a drop of 5,000 people who describe themselves as employed. The labor force itself dropped by twice that amount, bringing the unemployment rate down despite a drop in employment.

Broward will receive a seasonally adjusted rate later in the month, but the raw rate dropped from 8.1 percent to 7.8 percent.

A separate survey of businesses tracks payroll growth, and it showed a wobbly month in South Florida for hiring.

Broward added just 1,700 payroll jobs since August 2011, compared to between 4,500 and 6,500 jobs per month at the start of 2012. In Miami-Dade, the 5,800 new jobs marked the second-worst month of job creation in nearly two years. The worst: July 2012.

Read more Business stories from the Miami Herald

  •  
FILE - In this April 7, 2014 file photo, a man arrives for the Inside Bitcoins conference and trade show in New York. The February 2014 arrests of Pascal Reid and Michell Espinoza marked the first time any state has brought money laundering charges involving bitcoins, according to Miami-Dade State Attorney Katherine Fernandez Rundle. And it’s likely to be a closely-watched test of whether criminal law can adapt to new digital forms of payment.

    Fla. bitcoin case tests money laundering limits

    Two police officers burst through a hotel room door with guns drawn, yelling "Police! Get Down!" just after an alleged money laundering transaction went down. But instead of briefcases stuffed with a drug dealer's cash, this exchange involved an undercover officer with supposedly stolen credit cards and the virtual currency bitcoin.

  • Silver Airways forges agreement with ANA

    Silver Airways, the fast-growing start-up airline, has announced an interline ticketing arrangement with Japan’s All Nippon Airways (ANA). Under the agreement, each airline will be able to issue a single ticket that includes travel on both airlines and their partners. Since it launched its own website a year ago, Silver has added code-sharing and/or interline agreements with American Airlines, Bahamasair, Delta Air Lines, JetBlue, USAirways, and Germany’s Hahn Air in addition to a long-standing agreement with United Airlines. The Fort Lauderdale-based regional airline offers 170 daily flights to 38 destinations including Florida and the Bahamas.

  •  
The Perez Art Museum Miami, is nearing the end of the construction process on Tuesday Aug. 26, 2013.

    Pérez Art Museum Miami

    Pérez Art Museum Miami construction nearing finish line

    With a grand opening scheduled to coincide with Art Basel Miami Beach later this year, the new Pérez Art Museum Miami is racing to the finish line.

Miami Herald

Join the
Discussion

The Miami Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

The Miami Herald uses Facebook's commenting system. You need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment. If you have questions about commenting with your Facebook account, click here.

Have a news tip? You can send it anonymously. Click here to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Miami Herald and el Nuevo Herald.

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK

  • Marketplace

Today's Circulars

  • Quick Job Search

Enter Keyword(s) Enter City Select a State Select a Category