Who's still being held at Guantánamo

 

crosenberg@miamiherald.com

This is the list of 149 detainees currently held at Guantánamo. McClatchy Newspapers and The Miami Herald consulted court and other public records as well as sources in tandem with secret U.S. military intelligence summaries provided by WikiLeaks to determine who was still being held there.

Clicking on the name will take you to the summary, which is based on U.S. intelligence that was considered valid at the time the summary was written, although the captives' attorneys generally dispute these findings.

In many cases, the summary also includes a photo of the detainee.

In January 2010, a federal, Obama administration task force sorted the detainees into separate categories, whose status we've incorporated into this list and are updating with decisions of the 2013 and 2014 Periodic Review Boards.

Of the 149 captives, 79 are approved for transfer in one fashion or another; 60 others are in a continue-to-detain status but have not been charged with a crime; nine are being handled through military commission proceedings (two through plea bargains); and one is a convicted war criminal, currently serving a life sentence.

Note: No intelligence summary was available for two men listed below because they were processed at the prison after the era that the Wikileaks documents captured. In their place we provide links to the Defense Department news releases announcing their arrival at Guantánamo.

Spellings of names may vary from other documents, reports. So we've included the U.S Internment Serial Number, or ISN, along with a form of each captive's name.

ISN 26 Fahed A Ghazi, Yemeni. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found.

ISN 27 Uthman Abdul Rahim Mohammed Uthman, Yemeni. He won his habeas corpus lawsuit on Feb. 24, 2010 but lost after the U.S. government appealed to the U.S. Appeals Court for the District of Columbia Circuit, which overturned the release order on March 29, 2011. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 28 Moath al Alwi, Yemeni. A federal judge upheld his indefinite detention on Dec 30, 2008, denying his habeas corpus petition. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 29 Mohammed al-Ansi, Yemeni. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 30 Ahmed al-Hikimi, Yemeni. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found.

ISN 31 Mahmud al-Mujahid, Yemeni, arrived the day the prison opened, Jan. 11, 2002. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee. But a national security parole panel, called a Periodic Review Board declared him approved for transfer, with security arrangements, Jan. 9, 2014.

ISN 33 Mohammed al-Adahi, Yemeni. He won his habeas corpus lawsuit on Aug. 17, 2009 but lost when the government appealed the decision and the U.S. Appeals Court for the District of Columbia Circuit overturned the decision on July 13, 2010, and lost again at the federal court Aug. 7, 2014. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found.

ISN 34 Al-Khadr A al-Yafi, Yemeni. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 35 Idris Idris, Yemeni. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 37 Abdel Malik Abdel Wahab al Rahabi, Yemeni, arrived the day the prison opened, Jan. 11, 2002. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee. A national security parole panel, called a Periodic Review Board, upheld that status on March 5, 2014.

ISN 38 Rida S al-Yazidi, Tunisian, arrived the day the prison opened, Jan. 11, 2002. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 39 Ali Hamza al Bahlul, Yemeni, arrived the day the prison opened, Jan. 11, 2002. A military commission convicted him of war crimes on Nov. 3, 2008 and sentenced him to life at Guantánamo for working as Osama bin Laden's media secretary in Afghanistan.

ISN 40 Abdelqadir al-Mudhaffari, Yemeni. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found.

ISN 41 Majid Abdu Ahmed, Yemeni. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 42 Abdul Rahman Shalabi, Saudi, arrived the day the prison opened, Jan. 11, 2002. He has been widely reported as one of the longest running most committed hunger strikers at the prison. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 43 Samir al-Hasan Moqbel, Yemeni, arrived the day the prison opened, Jan. 11, 2002. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found. On April 14, 2013, he became the first detainee at Guantánamo to contribute an op-ed column to The New York Times, a description of his forced-feeding ordeal he gave to his attorney.

ISN 44 Mohammed Ghanem, Yemeni, arrived the day the prison opened, Jan. 11, 2002. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 45 Ali Ahmad al-Razihi, Yemeni, arrived the day the prison opened, Jan. 11, 2002. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee. But a national security parole panel, called a Periodic Review Board declared him approved for transfer, with security arrangements, on April 23, 2014.

ISN 63 Mohammed al-Qahtani, Saudi. He was subjected to such cruel "enhanced interrogation techniques" at Guantánamo that a senior Pentagon official, Susan Crawford, told The Washington Post's Bob Woodward that she concluded he was tortured in U.S. custody, and in May 2008 dropped charges against him alleging he was a co-conspirator in the Sept. 11 plot. He's been at the Guantánamo prison since February 2002, according to leaked military documents. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial.

ISN 88 Adham Mohammad Ali Awad, Yemeni. A federal judge upheld his indefinite detention Aug. 12, 2009, denying his habeas corpus petition, and a three-judge panel of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit upheld that decision on June 8, 2010. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found.

ISN 91 Abdel al-Saleh, Yemeni. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found.

ISN 115 Abdul Rahman Salih Nasir, Yemeni. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found.

ISN 117 Muktar Yahya Najee al-Warafi, Yemeni. A federal judge upheld his indefinite detention March 24, 2010, finding he was more likely than not a part of the Taliban. His attorneys appealed it and a three-judge panel at the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit upheld it in part but remanded the case back to the U.S. District Court on Feb. 22, 2011 to determine whether he was a full-time medic. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found.

ISN 128 Ghaleb Nasser Bihani, Yemeni. A federal judge upheld his indefinite detention on Jan. 28, 2008, denying his habeas corpus petition, and a three-judge panel of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit upheld that decision on Jan. 5, 2010. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee. But a national security parole panel, called a Periodic Review Board declared him approved for transfer, with security arrangements, on May 28, 2014.

ISN 131 Salem bin Kanad, a Yemeni who considers himself a Saudi. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee. A national security parole panel, called a Periodic Review Board, upheld that status on May 21, 2014.

ISN 152 Asim Thahit Abdullah al-Khalaqi, Yemeni. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 153 Fayiz Ahmad Yahia Suleiman, Yemeni. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 163 Khalid Abdal el Gabar Mohammad Othman, Yemeni. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 165 Adil Said al Haj Obeid Al Busays, Yemeni. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found.

ISN 167 Ali Yahya Mahdi Abdo, Yemeni. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found.

ISN 168 Adel al Hakeemy Shahin, Tunisian. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 170 Sharaf Ahmad Muhammad Masud, Yemeni. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 171 Abu Bakr Ibn Ali Muhammad Alahdal, Yemeni. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found.

ISN 174 Hisham Sliti, Tunisian. A federal judge upheld his indefinite detention on Dec. 30, 2008, denying his habeas corpus petition. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 178 Tariq Ali Abdallah Ahmad Ba’Awadha, Yemeni. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found.

ISN 189 Falen Gherebi, also called Rafdat Muhammad Faqi Aljj-Saqqaf, a Libyan. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 195 Mohammed al-Shimrani, Saudi. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 197 Younis Abdurrahman Chekkouri, Moroccan. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 202 Mahmud Omar Ben Atif, Yemeni. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, , if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found.

ISN 223 Abd al-Rahman Abdu Abu Ghayth Sulayman, Yemeni. A federal judge upheld his indefinite detention on July 20, 2010, denying his habeas corpus petition. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found.

ISN 224 Abd al-Rahman Abdullah, Yemeni. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 232 Fawzi al Odah, Kuwaiti. A federal judge upheld his indefinite detention on Aug. 23, 2009, denying his habeas corpus petition, and a three-judge panel of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit upheld that decision on June 30, 2010. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee. But a national security parole panel, called a Periodic Review Board declared him approved for transfer, with security arrangements, July 14, 2014.

ISN 233 Muhammad Salah Hussain al-Shaykh, Yemeni. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found.

ISN 235 Saeed Ahmed Mohammed Abdullah Serem Jarabh, Yemeni. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 239 Shaker Aamer, Saudi-born former UK resident. In January 2010 a federal task force designated him as a candidate for a transfer to a currently undisclosed country subject to "appropriate security measures." An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 240 Abdullah Yahia Yusif al Shibli, Saudi-born Yemeni. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found.

ISN 242 Khaled Ahmad Qasim Mused, Yemeni. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 244 Abdul Latif Nasir, Moroccan. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 249 Muhammad Abdullah Muhammad al-Hamiri, Yemeni. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 251 Mohammad Sa'id S Bin Salman, Yemeni. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found.

ISN 254 Muhammed Ali Husayn, Yemeni. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 255 Said Muhammed Salih Hatim, Yemeni. He won his habeas corpus lawsuit on Dec. 16, 2009, but the decision was vacated after the U.S. government appealed to the U.S. Appeals Court for the District of Columbia Circuit, which on Feb. 15, 2011 ordered the lower court to reconsider its ruling. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 257 Umar Bin Hamza Abdulayev, Tajik. Cleared for release through both Bush and Obama administration review processes, his lawyer notified the federal court that he fears for his life if repatriated. If a third country can't be found to resettle him safely, he says, he'd rather spend his life in U.S. detention. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 259 Fadil Hussein Saleh Hintif, Yemeni. He lost his habeas corpus lawsuit on Aug. 1, 2011. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 309 Muieen Adeen al-Sattar, born in the United Arab Emirates. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 321 Ahmed Yaslam Saijid Kuman, Yemeni. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found.

ISN 324 Mashour Abdullah Muqbel al Sabri, Yemeni. A federal judge upheld his indefinite detention Feb. 3, 2011, denying his habeas corpus petition. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 326 Ahmed Adnan Ahjam, Syrian. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release. A letter from attorneys to the Obama administration published by The New York Times June 27, 2014 identified him as selected for transfer to Uruguay.

ISN 327 Ali Hussein al Shaaban, Syrian. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release. A letter from attorneys to the Obama administration published by The New York Times June 27, 2014 identified him as selected for transfer to Uruguay.

ISN 329 Abdelhadi Faraj, Syrian. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release. A letter from attorneys to the Obama administration published by The New York Times June 27, 2014 identified him as selected for transfer to Uruguay.

ISN 434 Mustafa Abdul Qowi Abdul al-Shamiri, Yemeni. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 440 Mohammed Ali Fowza, Yemeni. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 441 Abdul Rahman Ahmed, Yemeni. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 461 Abd Al-Rahman Mohammed Al-Taty, Yemeni. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found.

ISN 498 Muhammad Ahmad Said Haydar, Yemeni. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found.

ISN 502 Adel bin Muhammed Ouerghi, Tunisian. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release. A letter from attorneys to the Obama administration published by The New York Times June 27, 2014 identified him as selected for transfer to Uruguay.

ISN 506 Mohammed Khalid Salih al-Dhuby, Yemeni. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found.

ISN 508 Salman Yahya Hassan Muhammad Rabeii, Yemeni. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 509 Muhammad Nasir Yahya Khusruf, Yemeni. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found.

ISN 511 Suleman Awad Suleman Bin Agil Al-Nahdi, Yemeni. A federal judge upheld his indefinite detention as Feb. 24, 2010, denying his habeas corpus petition. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 522 Yassim Qasim Muhammad Ismail Qasim, Yemeni. A federal judge upheld his indefinite detention April 8, 2010, denying his habeas corpus petition, and a three-judge panel of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit upheld that decision on April 8, 2011. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 535 Tariq Mahmud Ahmad el Sawah, Egyptian. In 2008, a Bush administration era Pentagon prosecutor swore out conspiracy and providing material support for terrorism military commissions charges for allegedly serving as an al Qaeda explosives expert in a now defunct version of the military commissions. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial. Subsequently, the war court's chief prosecutor declared the material support charge no longer viable.

ISN 549 Umar Said Salim al-Dini, Yemeni. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found.

ISN 550 Walid Said Bin Said Zaid, Yemeni. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found.

ISN 552 Fayez Mohammed Ahmed al-Kandari, Kuwaiti. During the Bush administration he was designated for trial by a now defunct version of the military commissions. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 553 Abdul Khaliq al-Baidhani, Yemeni. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 554 Fahmi Salem Said Al Asani, Yemeni. A federal judge upheld his indefinite detention as Feb. 24, 2010, denying his habeas corpus petition. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 560 Hajawali Mohmad, Afghan. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 564 Jalal bin Amer, Yemeni. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 566 Masour Mohamed Mutaya Ali, Saudi-born Yemeni. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 569 Suhail Abdo Anam Shorabi, Yemeni. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial.

ISN 570 Sabri Mohammed Ebrahim, Yemeni. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 572 Saleh Mohammed Seleh al Thabbi, Saudi-born Yemeni. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 575 Saad Nasir Mukbl al-Azani, Yemeni. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 576 Zahir Omar Hamis Bin Hamdoun, Yemeni. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 578 Abdul Aziz al-Suwedy, Yemeni. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found.

ISN 680 Imad Abdallah, Yemeni. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 682 Ghassan al-Sharbi, Saudi. During the Bush administration he was designated for trial by a now defunct version of the military commissions using a crime, providing material support for terror, that the war court prosecutor considers no longer viable. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial.

ISN 684 Mohammed Taha Mattan, West Bank Palestinian. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.A letter from attorneys to the Obama administration published by The New York Times June 27, 2014 identified him as selected for transfer to Uruguay.

ISN 685 Abdul Razak Ali, Algerian. A federal judge upheld his indefinite detention as June 23, 2011, denying the habeas corpus petition of this Taliban government media spokesman, governor and Cabinet minister. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial.

ISN 686 Abdul Ghaib Ahmad Hakim, Yemeni. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 688 Fahi Akhmed, Yemeni. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found.

ISN 689 Mohammed Ahmed Salam al-Khateeb, Yemeni. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 690 Abdul Qader Ahmed Hussein, Yemeni. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 691 Mohammed al-Zarnouqi, Yemeni. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 694 Sufiyan Barhoumi, Algerian. During the Bush administration he was designated for trial by a now defunct version of the military commissions. A federal judge upheld his indefinite detention on Sept. 3, 2009, denying his habeas corpus petition, and a three-judge panel of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit upheld that decision detention on Jun. 22, 2010. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial.

ISN 695 Omar Khalif Mohammed Abu Baker Mahjoub, Libyan. A federal judge upheld his indefinite detention April 19, 2010, denying his habeas corpus petition. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 696 Jubran Qahtani, Saudi. During the Bush administration he was designated for trial by a now defunct version of the military commissions using a crime, providing material support for terror, that the war court prosecutor considers no longer viable. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial.

ISN 702 Ravil Mingazov, Russian. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial. He won his habeas corpus lawsuit on May 13, 2010. The U.S. government appealed to the U.S. Appeals Court for the District of Columbia Circuit.

ISN 708 Ismael Ali Faraj al Bakush, Libyan. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 713 Muhammad Murdi Issa al Zahrani, Saudi. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 722 Abu Wa'el Dhiab, Syrian. He's also sometimes identified as Jihad Dhiab. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release. A letter from attorneys to the Obama administration published by The New York Times June 27, 2014 identified him as selected for transfer to Uruguay.

ISN 728 Abdul Muhammad Ahmad Nassir al-Muhajari, Yemeni. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found.

ISN 757 Ahmed Ould Abd al-Aziz, Mauritanian. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 753 Abdul Zahir, Afghan. In 2006, the Bush administration designated him for trial by military commissions in charges the Obama administration had dismissed without prejudice. Charges included attacking civilians, aiding the enemy and conspiracy for allegedly attacking a civilian vehicle, injuring three journalists, and supporting the Taliban and al Qaeda forces in hostilities against coalition forces in Afghanistan.

ISN 760 Mohamedou Ould Slahi, Mauritanian. He won his habeas corpus lawsuit on March 22, 2010 but the U.S. government appealed to the U.S. Appeals Court for the District of Columbia Circuit, which on Nov. 5, 2010 ordered the lower court to review his detention with a different standard. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial.

ISN 762 Obaidullah, Afghan. During the Bush administration he was designated for trial by a now defunct version of the military commissions. Attorney General Eric Holder has also approved his trial by the new revamped military commission. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial. A federal judge upheld his indefinite detention Oct. 19, 2010.

ISN 768 Ahmed Muhammed Haza Al Darbi, Saudi. He pleaded guilty to terror charges Feb. 20, 2014 as an accomplice in the 2002 terrorist attack against the French oil tanker, MV Limburg, carried out while Darbi was already at Guantánamo. He agreed to testify at the war court in exchange for return to a Saudi prison in 2018 and a maximum 15-year sentence begun Feb. 20, 2014.

ISN 836 Ayub Murshid Ali Salih, Yemeni. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 837 Bashir Nasir Ali al-Marwalah, Yemeni. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 838 Shawqi Awad Balzuhair, Yemeni. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 839 Mussab Omar Ali al-Madhwani, Yemeni. A federal judge upheld his indefinite detention on Dec. 14, 2009, denying his habeas corpus petition., and a three-judge panel of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit upheld his indefinite detention on May 27, 2011. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 840 Hayil al-Mithali, Yemeni. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 841 Said Salih Said, Yemeni. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 893 Tawfiq Nassar al-Bihani, Yemeni. A federal judge upheld his indefinite detention on Sept. 22, 2010, denying his habeas corpus petition. His brother, Ghaleb, is ISN 128, also lost his unlawful detention case. In January 2010, a federal task force approved him for conditional return to his homeland, a third country or transfer to the United States if the prison camps in Cuba are closed. It said he was eligible for conditional release, if the security situation in Yemen improves -- or a viable third-country settlement or rehabilitation program is found.

ISN 894 Mohammed Abdul Rahman, Tunisian. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 899 Shawali Khan, Afghan. A federal judge upheld his indefinite detention Sept. 3, 2010, denying his habeas corpus petition. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 928 Khi Ali Gul, Afghan. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 934 Abdul Ghani, Afghan. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 975 Bostan Karim, Afghan. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 1015 Hussain Salem Mohammad Almerfedi, Yemeni. He won his habeas corpus lawsuit on July 8, 2010, but the U.S. Appeals Court for the District of Columbia Circuit overturned the ruling on June 10, 2011. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 1017 Omar Mohammed Ali al-Rammah, Yemeni. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 1045 Mohammed Kamin, Afghan. He has been designated for trial by military commission.

ISN 1094 Saifullah A. Paracha, Pakistan. A former U.S. green card holder, he is also the eldest of the Guantánamo detainees, according to leaked detention center records. He was born in Aug. 17, 1947, and has a history of coronary artery disease. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial.

ISN 1103 Mohammed Zahir, Afghan. An Obama administration task force in January 2010 designated him as cleared for release.

ISN 1119 Hamidullah, Afghan. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 1453 Sanad Yislam al-Kazimi, Yemeni. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial.

ISN 1456 Hassan Ali Bin Attash,Yemeni. According to leaked military records, he is the youngest of the current detainees. He is also the brother of high-value detainee Walid Bin Attash, held in a different camp. His lawyer says they've never seen each other at Guantánamo. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial.

ISN 1457 Abdul Ali Sharqawi, Yemeni known as Riyadh the Facilitator. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial.

ISN 1460 Abdul Rahim Gulam Rabbani, Saudi-born Pakistani. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial.

ISN 1461 Ahmed Ghulam Rabbani, Saudi-born Pakistani. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial.

ISN 1463 Abdulsalam al Hela, Yemeni. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 3148 Harun al Afghani, Afghan. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial.

ISN 10011 Mustafa Ahmad al-Hawsawi, Saudi who's charged in death-penalty proceedings by military commission as an alleged co-conspirator in the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks. The ICRC says Pakistani authorities arrested him March 1, 2003 in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. As a former CIA "black site" captive who was taken to Guantánamo in September 2006, he is held in secret camp where the Pentagon segregates so-called high-value detainees. Hear him speak to a military panel at Guantánamo in March 2007. Transcript here.

ISN 10013 Ramzi bin al Shibh, Yemeni who's charged in death-penalty proceedings by military commission as an alleged co-conspirator in the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks. The ICRC says Pakistani authorities arrested him Sept. 11, 2002 in Karachi, Pakistan. As a former CIA "black site" captive who was taken to Guantánamo in September 2006, he is held in secret camp where the Pentagon segregates so-called high-value detainees.

ISN 10014 Walid bin Attash, Yemeni who's charged in death-penalty proceedings by military commission as an alleged co-conspirator in the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks. The ICRC says Pakistani authorities arrested him on April 29, 2003 in Karachi, Pakistan. As a former CIA "black site" captive who was taken to Guantánamo in September 2006, he is held in secret camp where the Pentagon segregates so-called high-value detainees. Hear him speak to a military panel at Guantánamo in March 2007. Transcript here.

ISN 10015 Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri, Saudi who's charged in death-penalty proceedings by military commission as an alleged conspirator in the October 2000 al Qaeda suicide bombing of the USS Cole off Aden, Yemen. The ICRC says he was arrested in October 2002 in Dubai, the United Arab Emirates. As a former CIA "black site" captive who was taken to Guantánamo in September 2006, he is held in secret camp where the Pentagon segregates so-called high-value detainees. Hear him speak to a military panel at Guantánamo in March 2007. Transcript here.

ISN 10016 Zayn al Abdeen Mohammed al Hussein, Palestinian known as Abu Zubaydah. The ICRC says he was arrested March 28, 2002 in Faisalabad, Pakistan. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial. Hear him speak in English to a military panel at Guantánamo in March 2007. Transcript here.

ISN 10017 Abu Faraj al-Libi, Libyan. The ICRC says Pakistani authorities arrested him on May 2, 2005 in Mardan, Pakistan. As a former CIA "black site" captive who was taken to Guantánamo in September 2006, he is held in secret camp where the Pentagon segregates so-called high-value detainees. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial.

ISN 10018 Ammar al-Baluchi, Pakistani who's charged in death-penalty proceedings by military commission as an alleged co-conspirator in the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks. The ICRC says Pakistani authorities arrested him on April 29, 2003 in Karachi, Pakistan. As a former CIA "black site" captive who was taken to Guantánamo in September 2006, he is held in secret camp where the Pentagon segregates so-called high-value detainees.

ISN 10019 Riduan Isomuddin, Indonesian known as Hambali. The ICRC says he was arrested Aug. 11, 2003 in Bangkok, Thailand. As a former CIA "black site" captive who was taken to Guantánamo in September 2006, he is held in secret camp where the Pentagon segregates so-called high-value detainees. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial.

ISN 10020 Majid Khan, Pakistani. The ICRC says this Baltimore area educated man was arrested March 5, 2003 in Karachi, Pakistan. As a former CIA "black site" captive, he was taken to Guantánamo in September 2006 and held in secret camp where the Pentagon segregates so-called high-value detainees. He turned government witness and pleaded guilty to war crimes Feb. 29, 2012, and is held in a separate secret site for cooperating ex-CIA captive witnesses at Guantánamo. There is currently no other. Hear him speak to a military panel at Guantánamo in March 2007. Transcript here.

ISN 10021 Mohd Farik Bin Amin, Malaysian known as Zubair. The ICRC says he was arrested June 8, 2003 in Bangkok, Thailand. As a former CIA "black site" captive who was taken to Guantánamo in September 2006, he is held in secret camp where the Pentagon segregates so-called high-value detainees. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial.

ISN 10022 Bashir Lap, Malaysian known as Lilie. The ICRC says he was arrested Aug. 11, 2003 in Bangkok, Thailand. As a former CIA "black site" captive who was taken to Guantánamo in September 2006, he is held in secret camp where the Pentagon segregates so-called high-value detainees. In January 2010, a federal task force recommended he be considered for trial.

ISN 10023 Hassan Guleed, Somali. The ICRC says he was arrested March 4, 2004 in Djibouti. As a former CIA "black site" captive who was taken to Guantánamo in September 2006, he is held in secret camp where the Pentagon segregates so-called high-value detainees. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 10024 Khalid Sheik Mohammad, Pakistani who's charged in death-penalty proceedings by military commission as the alleged mastermind in the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks. The ICRC says Pakistani authorities arrested him March 1, 2003 in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. As a former CIA "black site" captive who was taken to Guantánamo in September 2006, he is held in secret camp where the Pentagon segregates so-called high-value detainees.

ISN 10025 Abdul Malik, Kenyan. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

ISN 10026 Abd al Hadi al Iraqi, Iraqi. The Pentagon announced that this former CIA captive was taken to Guantánamo on April 27, 2007. He is held in secret camp where the Pentagon segregates so-called high-value detainees. The war crimes prosecutor has sworn out charges against him, alleging he was commander of al-Qaida's army between 2002 and 2004, and on June 2, 2014 a senior Pentagon approved his trial by military commission.

ISN 10029 Muhammad Rahim al-Afghani, Afghan. The Pentagon announced that this former CIA captive was taken to Guantánamo on March 14, 2008. He is held in secret camp where the Pentagon segregates so-called high-value detainees. A multi-agency federal task force classified him in January 2010 as “continued detention pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (2001), as informed by principles of the laws of war," an indefinite detainee.

Read more Guantánamo stories from the Miami Herald

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