Haiti

After the earthquake

Haiti: Photographer Al Diaz Haiti: Photographer Carl Juste Haiti: Photographer Patrick Farrell MiamiHerald.com

Haiti: One year after the earthquake

  • A man carries a table as he passes a destroyed building in Port-au-Prince, Jan. 5, 2011. ELIANA APONTE / FOR THE HERALD

  • Haitian people walk on a street in Port-au-Prince, Jan. 5, 2011. ELIANA APONTE / FOR THE HERALD

  • Haitians infected with cholera receive treatment in a clinic set up by the International Red Cross in Port-au-Prince, Jan. 4, 2011. ELIANA APONTE / FOR THE HERALD

  • Haitian Camp leader Archille Laguerre, right, visits a family at a refuge camp in Jacmel, Haiti, Jan. 3, 2011. ELIANA APONTE / FOR THE HERALD

  • Haitian artist William Georges poses in his workshop in Jacmel, Haiti, on Jan. 3, 2011. ELIANA APONTE / FOR THE HERALD

  • Haitians play a ball next to a colonial building in the park in Jacmel, Haiti on Jan. 3, 2011. ELIANA APONTE / FOR THE HERALD

  • Haitian people walk next to a colonial building in Jacmel, Haiti, on Jan. 3, 2011. ELIANA APONTE / FOR THE HERALD

  • Ephesien Figaro, 20, reads on a boat in Jacmel, Haiti, on Jan. 3, 2011. ELIANA APONTE / FOR THE HERALD

  • A boy walks next to a colonial building in Jacmel, Haiti, on Jan. 3, 2011. ELIANA APONTE / FOR THE HERALD

  • People walk at the market in Jacmel, Haiti, on Jan. 3, 2011. ELIANA APONTE / FOR THE HERALD

  • Sitting inside the destroyed national cathedral, Fritz Robert Pierre-Saint, 23, holds his daughter, Cristella Pierre-Saint, as he waits for visitors to peddle for some loose change, Jan. 7, 2011. He admits that Haitians don't care enough to give and depends on the charity of outsiders. Cristella was born on the day of the earthquake just outside the cathedral. She lost her mother just after birth when she killed by the collapsing church. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • The streets surrounding the National Palace come to life as vendors sell their wares in the tent city within the capital, Jan. 8, 2011. The statue of Toussaint L'Ouverture is surrounded by the encroaching makeshift tents a year later after the earthquake. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • A woman jumps across the debris inside Our Lady of the Assumption searching for anything of value, Jan. 7, 2011. Many of the squatters living outside the walls of the national cathedral were killed when the historic church came crashing down on their dwellings. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Peterson Joseph, 24, lost his leg and home to the earthquake. He checks on his belongings hidden in sheets that once substituted for a tent, Jan. 7, 2011. He is among the many who were injured or killed when the walls of Our Lady of Assumption, the national cathedral, came crashing down. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • With land for new settlements hard to come by and more than one million still living in tent cities, some aid organizations are helping owners repair and fortify their damaged homes. Jusper Charitable, of Carrefour-Feuilles, is one of the residents fixing up her home. PETER ANDREW BOSCH / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • After the Jan. 12 earthquake thousands of people rushed to the empty lot at the Brandt industrial complex, throwing up tents and tarps. As of late December there were 24,039 people living at the camp. Jean Phillip Gustav, 25, runs a tailor's shop in the camp. PETER ANDREW BOSCH / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • After the Jan. 12 earthquake, thousands of people rushed to the empty lot at the Brandt industrial complex, throwing up tents and tarps. As of late December there were 24,039 people living at the camp. Joseph Jenny-Carls Rools is a pastor and is now the de-facto mayor of the encampment. PETER ANDREW BOSCH / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • After the Jan. 12 earthquake, thousands of people rushed to the empty lot at the Brandt industrial complex, throwing up tents and tarps. As of late December there were 24,039 people living at the camp. The owner, Johnny Brandt, would like the 13.6-acre lot back but recognizes that the people living there have nowhere to go. Children jump rope at the camp to pass time. PETER ANDREW BOSCH / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • The streets surrounding the National Palace come to life as vendors sell their wares in the tent city within the capital. The statue of Toussaint L'Ouverture is surrounded by the encroaching makeshift tents a year later after the earthquake in Haiti. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Monel Simon, 40, a resident of Carrefour-Feuilles, dumps rubble out from his damaged home. With land for new settlements hard to come by and more than one million still living in tent cities, some aid organizations are helping owners repair and fortify their damaged homes. PETER ANDREW BOSCH / MAIMI HERALD STAFF

  • More than one million people are still living in tent cities in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, but some aid organizations are helping owners repair and fortify their damaged homes. Many homes are damaged beyond repair like this one in Carrefour-Feuilles. PETER ANDREW BOSCH / MAIMI HERALD STAFF

  • A blind toddler sits outside the national cathedral in Haiti, Our Lady of the Assumption, Jan. 8, 2011. Almost a year later after the destructive 7.0 earthquake claimed 300,000 lives and displaced over millions Haitians, many are still living in the streets surrounding the national cathedral of Port-au-Prince feeling abandoned by the government. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Samantha Bien-Aime, 28, bathes her son, Jocelyn Neslon, in the street across from the devastated Our Lady of the Assumption national cathedral in Port-au-Prince, Jan. 8, 2011. Almost a year later after the destructive 7.0 earthquake claimed 300,000 lives and displaced over millions Haitians, many are still living in the streets surrounding the national cathedral of Port-au-Prince feeling abandoned by the government. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Samantha Bien-Aime, 28, bathes her son, Jocelyn Neslon, in the street across from the devastated Our Lady of the Assumption national cathedral in Port-au-Prince, Jan. 8, 2011. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • In the shade of his tent, Fritz Robert Pierre-Saint dries his 1-year-old daughter, Cristella, after bathing her in the street across from the devastated national cathedral, Jan. 8, 2011. Cristella's mother, Joseline Fleurivalle, perished during the earthquake. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • The streets surrounding the National Palace come to life as vendors sell their wares in the tent city within the capital. The statue of Toussaint L'Ouverture is surrounded by the encroaching makeshift tents a year later after the earthquake in Haiti. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Christian Amazan, left, and Reynold Noel, who are residents of Carrefour-Feuilles, mix gravel for a home repair job. With land for new settlements hard to come by and more than 1 million still living in tent cities, some aid organizations are helping owners repair and fortify their damaged homes. PETER ANDREW BOSCH / MAIMI HERALD STAFF

  • Haitians stand outside of the destroyed national cathedral in Port-au-Prince, Jan. 5, 2011. ELIANA APONTE / FOR THE HERALD

  • A man looks at a sprawling tent city near Croix-des-Bouquets in December 2010. The community, which at one point held 3,000 residents, is built in a ravine and prone to flooding. One year after the earthquake, aid groups say there are still about 810,000 people living in some 1,150 improvised tent cities. JIM WYSS / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • A Haitian woman stands next to her new shelter at L'annexe de la Mairie refuge camp in Port-au-Prince, Haiti Jan. 5, 2011. ELIANA APONTE / FOR THE HERALD

  • A workman shovels gravel at the Tabarre Issa emergency relocation camp, where small houses are being built for earthquake victims living in tents in December 2010, almost a year after the earthquake in Haiti. JIM WYSS / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Trucks are filled with clean water in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Jan. 5, 2011. ELIANA APONTE / FOR THE HERALD

  • Haitian residents filled jugs with clean water at a Henfrasa refuge camp in Port-au-Prince, Jan. 5, 2011. ELIANA APONTE / FOR THE HERALD

  • Melian Remis, 38, sits outside her new shelter in Tabarre Issa where she lives with seven family members. Remis said she's thankful to be out of a tent and in a solid structure, but she complains that it's too small to be a permanent solution. JIM WYSS / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • A man carries a table at an old Aviation refuge camp in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Jan. 4, 2011. ELIANA APONTE / FOR THE HERALD

  • The international community is building one-room shelters on the grounds of the Tabarre Issa relocation camp. The government and aid organizations hoped Tabarre Issa and a second camp, Corail, would turn into thriving viable communities outside of earthquake-ravaged Port-au-Prince. But one year after the earthquake, residents complain the camps are too barren and isolated -- and too far from the jobs and schools of Port-au-Prince. JIM WYSS / MIAMI HERALD STAFF