Haiti

After the earthquake

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Haiti earthquake: Photographer Peter Andrew Bosch

  • Maxime Shinday (cq) posing in the small one room bedroom where all the orphans sleep at the International Children Rescue Ministries, the white mates on the floor behind him are what they sleep on, this was shot , Friday December 17th 2010. When the Jan 12 earthquake destroyed their small orphanage in downtown Port-au-Prince, International Children Rescue Ministries moved their 40 children to the grounds of their church in Kenscoff - about an hour outside of the city. The complex is not ideal. All 40 children sleep on foam mats in a tiny room at night. Church pews double as desks. Since the earthquake, the orphanage has been trying to contact some of the thousands of aid organizations and non-profit groups that are working in the country, to no avail. PETER ANDREW BOSCH / MAIMI HERALD STAFF

  • Two young orphans play on a bike at the International Children Rescue Ministries , Friday December 17th 2010. When the Jan 12 earthquake destroyed their small orphanage in downtown Port-au-Prince, International Children Rescue Ministries moved their 40 children to the grounds of their church in Kenscoff - about an hour outside of the city. The complex is not ideal. All 40 children sleep on foam mats in a tiny room at night. Church pews double as desks. Since the earthquake, the orphanage has been trying to contact some of the thousands of aid organizations and non-profit groups that are working in the country, to no avail. PETER ANDREW BOSCH / MAIMI HERALD STAFF

  • Lector Gatshing a teacher looking over sophonie Bonamy as she takes a test at the shcool. When the Jan 12 earthquake destroyed their small orphanage in downtown Port-au-Prince, International Children Rescue Ministries moved their 40 children to the grounds of their church in Kenscoff - about an hour outside of the city. The complex is not ideal. All 40 children sleep on foam mats in a tiny room at night. Church pews double as desks. Since the earthquake, the orphanage has been trying to contact some of the thousands of aid organizations and non-profit groups that are working in the country, to no avail. PETER ANDREW BOSCH / MAIMI HERALD STAFF

  • A group of chirldern at the orhanage pose for a picture, Friday December 17th 2010. When the Jan 12 earthquake destroyed their small orphanage in downtown Port-au-Prince, International Children Rescue Ministries moved their 40 children to the grounds of their church in Kenscoff - about an hour outside of the city. The complex is not ideal. All 40 children sleep on foam mats in a tiny room at night. Church pews double as desks. Since the earthquake, the orphanage has been trying to contact some of the thousands of aid organizations and non-profit groups that are working in the country, to no avail. PETER ANDREW BOSCH / MAIMI HERALD STAFF

  • Loveley Josesph working during class, Friday December 17th 2010. When the Jan 12 earthquake destroyed their small orphanage in downtown Port-au-Prince, International Children Rescue Ministries moved their 40 children to the grounds of their church in Kenscoff - about an hour outside of the city. The complex is not ideal. All 40 children sleep on foam mats in a tiny room at night. Church pews double as desks. Since the earthquake, the orphanage has been trying to contact some of the thousands of aid organizations and non-profit groups that are working in the country, to no avail. PETER ANDREW BOSCH / MAIMI HERALD STAFF

  • More than 1 million people are still living in tent cities,in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, some aid organizations are helping owners repair and fortify their damaged homes. Many homes are to damaged to even repair like this on in Carrefour-Feuilles. PETER ANDREW BOSCH / MAIMI HERALD STAFF

  • With land for new settlements hard to come by and more than 1 million still living in tent cities, some aid organizations are helping owners repair and fortify their damaged homes. PADF says it costs, on average, $1,300 to rebuild a damaged home and bring it up to earthquake standards. That's almost the same price as many of the temporary shelters that otherorganizations are trying to provide. Christian Amazan (left) and Reynold Noel (right) who are residents of Carrefour-Feuilles, are mixing gravel for a homes repaired. PETER ANDREW BOSCH / MAIMI HERALD STAFF

  • With land for new settlements hard to come by and more than 1 million still living in tent cities, some aid organizations are helping owners repair and fortify their damaged homes. PADF says it costs, on average, $1,300 to rebuild a damaged home and bring it up to earthquake standards. That's almost the same price as many of the temporary shelters that other organizations are trying to provide. Monel Simon, 40 who is a residents of Carrefour-Feuilles, is one of the people having his house repaired, he is cleaning up one of the room that was damaged. PETER ANDREW BOSCH / MAIMI HERALD STAFF

  • After the Jan. 12 earthquake thousands of people rushed to the empty lot at the Brandt industrial complex, throwing up tents and tarps. As of late December there were 24,039 people living at the camp. The owner, Johnny Brandt, would like the 13.6 acre lot back but recognizes that the people living there have nowhere to go. Jean Phillip Gustav, who is 25 is a tailor that has his shop on the street in the camp PETER ANDREW BOSCH / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • After the Jan. 12 earthquake thousands of people rushed to the empty lot at the Brandt industrial complex, throwing up tents and tarps. As of late December there were 24,039 people living at the camp. The owner, Johnny Brandt, would like the 13.6 acre lot back but recognizes that the people living there have nowhere to go. Children play at the camp to pass time jumping rope. PETER ANDREW BOSCH / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • With land for new settlements hard to come by and more than 1 million still living in tent cities, some aid organizations are helping owners repair and fortify their damaged homes. PADF says it costs, on average, $1,300 to rebuild a damaged home and bring it up to earthquake standards. That's almost the same price as many of the temporary shelters that other organizations are trying to provide. Christian Amazan (left) and Reynold Noel (right) who are residents of Carrefour-Feuilles, are mixing gravel for a homes repaired. PETER ANDREW BOSCH / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • With land for new settlements hard to come by and more than 1 million still living in tent cities, some aid organizations are helping owners repair and fortify their damaged homes. PADF says it costs, on average, $1,300 to rebuild a damaged home and bring it up to earthquake standards. That's almost the same price as many of the temporary shelters that other organizations are trying to provide. In these fotos, residents of Carrefour-Feuilles, are having their homes repaired. Jusper Charitable, 38 is one of the residents fixing up her home. PETER ANDREW BOSCH / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Henderson ( his only name) has to take medicine every day for a skin rash at the International Children Rescue Ministries , Friday December 17th 2010. When the Jan 12 earthquake destroyed their small orphanage in downtown Port-au-Prince, International Children Rescue Ministries moved their 40 children to the grounds of their church in Kenscoff - about an hour outside of the city. The complex is not ideal. All 40 children sleep on foam mats in a tiny room at night. Church pews double as desks. Since the earthquake, the orphanage has been trying to contact some of the thousands of aid organizations and non-profit groups that are working in the country, to no avail. PETER ANDREW BOSCH / MAIMI HERALD STAFF

  • Veronique Antoine (left) and her husband Pienne Bontou Antoine , and their three children, Eudens (left bottom) who is eleven, Tajmara (right bottom) who is 10, and Steffi who is one, they are all Haiti quake survivors. This was shot Thursday, December 6th 2010. We're writing a profile on the family. PETER ANDREW BOSCH / MIAMI HERALD