Haiti

After the earthquake

Haiti: Photographer Al Diaz Haiti: Photographer Carl Juste Haiti: Photographer Patrick Farrell MiamiHerald.com

Access to water in Haiti is a matter of life and death

  • A group of women wash their legs, arms, and hands as a man bathes in the ocean. On the scenic shoreline of St. Marc, residents use the aqua-colored ocean as their source of food, a place to bathe and wash clothes. Just two hours away by boat, its northern neighbor, Grande Saline, a small sleepy fishing village, has become the epicenter for the outbreak of cholera. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • A young girl looks outward toward the vast ocean. Miles away, children have died due to an outbreak of cholera. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • The residents of Grand Saline wash their clothes in the river. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Two girls struggle with a bags full of water, which they sell on the streets of Archaie. Water is the source of the spreading of cholera. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Jilnese Celestin, 61, is admitted to Nicolas Armand Hospital after suffering from symptoms of cholera. Celestin awaits to be carried into the hospital due to the lack of energy and illness. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • On the scenic shoreline of St. Marc, residents use the aqua -colored ocean as their source of food, a place to bathe and wash clothes. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Perched on a rock, Minverva Joseph, 14, right, uses a strainer to catch "Trini," a staple of the area sold in markets, from the river that is believed to be contaminated and contributing to an outbreak of cholera. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Perched on a rock, Minverva Joseph, 14, uses a strainer to catch "Trini," a staple of the area sold in markets, from the river that is believed to be contaminated and contributing to an outbreak of cholera. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • A book containing all of the 200 cholera cases is kept by hospital officials. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • A Haitian girl carries a bag full of water, which she plans to sell on the streets of Archaie. Water is the source of the spreading of cholera. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Perched on a rock, Minverva Joseph, 14, (second from right) uses a strainer to catch "Trini," a staple of the area sold in markets, from the river that is believed to be contaminated and contributing to an outbreak of cholera. A group of friends joins her in catching the delicacy. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Nurse Suzette Richmond Barnard, 34, center, is on the front line of the cholera outbreak. She quickly moves to attend to patients. In the back is cholera patient Esperantha Pierre, 15, who is crying from leg cramps. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • A tear is trapped in the eye lid of Esperantha Pierre, 15, while she cries over the pain of leg cramps caused by cholera. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • A young boy plays with a bottle full with river water. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • The town of Grande Saline has no access to fresh, potable water. Many depend on the river as a source of drinking water. Young boys find shade beside the hull of a boat as residents fill empty containers with filtered water. The device pulls the murky colored water and transforms it to drinking water through a filtration process. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • A small fishing sail boat heads out to the ocean. On the scenic shoreline of St. Marc, residents use the aqua-colored ocean as their source of food, a place to bathe and wash clothes. Just two hours by boat its northern neighbor, Grande Saline, a small sleepy fishing village has become the epicenter for the outbreak of cholera. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Sherline Bayard washes her clothes in the river that is believed to be contaminated and contributing to an outbreak of cholera. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Sherline Bayard washes her clothes in the river that is believed to be contaminated and contributing to an outbreak of cholera. She washes her leg after completing the laundry. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Jilnese Celestin, 61, is admitted top Nicolas Armand Hospital after suffering from symptoms of cholera. Doctors Miguel Angel Arindell Barras, left, and Jessica Garcia Chavez attend to Celestin after he was admitted. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Jilnese Celestin, center, 61, is admitted top Nicolas Armand Hospital after suffering from symptoms of cholera. Vesta Collins, 47, left, sits by his side as a man gets a closer look at him. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Though residents of Grande Saline feel neglected, posters of candidates litter the doorways and walls of the small shacks. A young girl stands in doorway as she eats cubes of ice. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Jilnese Celestin, 61, is admitted to Nicolas Armand Hospital after suffering from symptoms of cholera. He rest on a cot as a hospital employee cleans the floor. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Jilnese Celestin, 61, is admitted to Nicolas Armand Hospital after suffering from symptoms of cholera. Celestin is offered medication and water by Cuban nurse Idalmis Borrero, left. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Perched on a rock, a woman uses a strainer to catch "Trini," a staple of the area sold in markets. She searched for Trini in the river that is believed to be contaminated and contributing to an outbreak of cholera. A group of friends joins her in catching the delicacy. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Perched on a rock, Minverva Joseph, 14, uses a strainer to catch "Trini," a staple of the area sold in markets, from the river that is believed to be contaminated and contributing to an outbreak of cholera. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Marie Serette Jean, 46, washes her clothes in river water, a source that is believed to be contaminated and the contributing to an outbreak of cholera. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Marie Serette Jean, 46, washes her clothes in river water, a source that is believed to be contaminated and the contributing to an outbreak of cholera. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • The eyes of Esperantha Pierre, 15, roll back after she cried over the pain of leg cramps caused by cholera. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Cholera patients rest plugged to IVs as they receive treatment. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • A group of women wash their legs, arms, and hands as a man bathes in the ocean. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • The town of Grande Saline has no access to fresh, potable water. Many depend on the river as a source of drinking water. Young girls hold an empty bottle of water underneath the doorway of a lopsided corroded zinc sheeting shack. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Jilnese Celestin, 61, is admitted to Nicolas Armand Hospital after suffering from symptoms of cholera. His face is partially cover by a doctor's coat as he receives treatment. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • A tear is trapped in the eye lid of Esperantha Pierre, 15, while she cries over the pain of leg cramps caused by cholera. She gets medical attention along with eight other cholera victims. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Jean Joris, 35, left, gestures in pain caused by cramps as he receives medical attention. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Ice melts from the hands of a little girl as she stands in the doorway. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Jean Joris, 35, left, gestures in pain caused by cramps as he receives medical attention. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Uruguay soldiers of the UN peace force stand ready for for trouble at the border of Haiti and the Dominican Republic on Oct. 29. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • A fishing boat rests on the shoreline of the river that is believed to have contributed to an outbreak of cholera. River fishing activity has reduced since the outbreak of cholera. Just two hours by boat its northern neighbor, Grande Saline, a small sleepy fishing village has become the epicenter for the outbreak of cholera. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Eighteen-month-old Charlus Nazdarson is one of the smallest victims of the cholera epidemic. Nazdarson rests next to her mother. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Fecky D'Ayiti, 26, sits to ponder at the grave site of his 7-year-old son, Fecanne, who died of cholera last Wednesday. The boy contracted the disease and died just 12 hours later. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF