Hurricane Earl in the Atlantic

  • A surfer enjoys the increasing size of the waves as energy from Hurricane Earl approaches the Outer Banks city of Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina. The Category 4 hurricane is expected to work its way up the Eastern seaboard. PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

  • Homeowner Steve Vance secures his home as Hurricane Earl approaches North Carolina's Outer Banks, Wednesday, September 1, 2010. (Chuck Liddy/Raleigh News & Observer/MCT) CHUCK LIDDY / MBR

  • AVON, NC - SEPTEMBER 01: Members of the Wood and Rollins families from Newport News, Virginia stand on the balcony of their rented beach house waving at passing cars, on September 1, 2010 in Avon, North Carolina. The families say they will ride out the storm in their rented beach house. A hurricane watch has been issued for most of the North Carolina coastline due to the approaching Category 4 Hurricane Earl that is expected to pass the Outer Banks of North Carolina early on the morning of September 3. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images) MARK WILSON / STAFF

  • Rudi Hosp and his daughter Ethnee, 6, of Germany, ride the surf as Hurricane Earl heads toward the eastern coast in Atlantic Beach, N.C., Wednesday, Sept. 1, 2010. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton) CHUCK BURTON / STF

  • This August 31, 2010 image taken by NASA astronaut Doug Wheelock from the International Space Station, shows Hurricane Earl. The US East Coast braced September 1 for a hit from Hurricane Earl, which weakened but still packed a punch as a storm watch already in effect in North Carolina was extended to Virginia. DOUG WHEELOCK/NASA

  • A surfer rides the waves as Hurricane Earl approaches in Buxton, N.C., Wednesday. A tourist evacuation of Hatteras Island and Ocracoke Island are underway as Hurricane Earl approaches North Carolina's Outer Banks. GERRY BROOME/AP

  • A surfer is engulfed by the waves while riding swells produced by Hurricane Earl in Buxton, N.C., Wednesday. A tourist evacuation of Hatteras Island and Ocracoke Island are underway as Hurricane Earl approaches North Carolina's Outer Banks. GERRY BROOME/AP

  • Bill Evans, of Fort Lauderdale Ocean Rescue, puts out the red warning flag for possible riptides, Wednesday. Hurricane Earl is churning up the East Coast hundreds of miles away but causing hazardous swimming conditions here. JOE CAVARETTA/SUN-SENTINEL

  • Amanda Wilson, of Fort Lauderdale Ocean Rescue, surfs Wednesday. Hurricane Earl is churning up the East Coast hundreds of miles away but causing hazardous swimming conditions here. JOE CAVARETTA/SUN-SENTINEL

  • Caleb Bourne, 11, of Ocean City, Md., bodyboards in Ocean City Tuesday. Hurricane Earl, now a powerful Category 4 storm, is headed toward the U.S. coast early Tuesday after battering islands across the northeastern Caribbean. Forecasters cautioned that it was still too early to tell how close Earl might come to land. LAURA EMMOS/AP

  • A kite surfer pulls the kite behind him in a heavy downpour as Hurricane Earl continues its track northward in the Caribbean on Wednesday, in Miami, Florida. The system, a category 4 storm with maximum sustained winds at 135 mph, is projected to head towards the area of North Carolina and may stay strong northwards along the east coast of the United States. JOE RAEDLE/GETTY IMAGES

  • A kite surfer is pulled along by a high wind as Hurricane Earl continues its track northward in the Caribbean on August 31, 2010 in Miami, Florida. The system, a category 4 storm with maximum sustained winds at 135 mph, is projected to head towards the area of North Carolina and may stay strong northwards along the east coast of the United States. JOE RAEDLE/GETTY IMAGES

  • A kite surfer flies through the air as he is pulled along by a high wind, while Hurricane Earl continues its track northward in the Caribbean on Tuesday in Miami, Florida. The system, a category 4 storm with maximum sustained winds at 135 mph, is projected to head towards the area of North Carolina and may stay strong northwards along the east coast of the United States. JOE RAEDLE/GETTY IMAGES

  • An Image provided by Nasa shows Hurricane Earl as is passes over the Leeward Islands Monday Aug. 30, 2010. Hurricane Earl, now a powerful Category 4 storm, barrels toward the U.S. coast early Tuesday Aug. 31, 2010 after battering tiny islands across the northeastern Caribbean with heavy rain and winds that damaged homes and toppled power lines. (AP Photo/NASA) PAT CARTER / STF

  • This August 31, 2010 NOAA satellite image shows Hurricane Earl(Lower-R). Powerful Hurricane Earl barreled toward the US East Coast on Tuesday, amid warnings it may cause catastrophic damage after dumping heavy rain and wind on Caribbean islands. Packing fierce winds of up to 135 miles (215 kilometers) an hour, Earl, now a powerful Category Four storm, brushed past Puerto Rico and churned toward the Atlantic, as experts forecast it may reach North Carolina by midweek and travel northward from there. If the forecasts are accurate, Earl will likely wreck plans for vacationers this Labor Day weekend, prompting them to desert area beaches. AFP PHOTO/HO/NOAA (Photo credit should read HO/AFP/Getty Images) HO / HANDOUT

  • ATLANTIC OCEAN - AUGUST 30: In this handout satellite image provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Hurricane Earl is seen on August 30, 2010 in the Atlantic Ocean as seen from space. Earl has been declared a Category 4 strength storm with sustained winds between 131 and 155 miles per hour. (Photo by NOAA via Getty Images) HANDOUT / HANDOUT