BP backlash in Pensacola Beach

  • Shirts and bumper stickers expressing frustration about the oil spill and some directed at BP, are popping up in local restaurants and shops along Pensacola Beach. Sharon Flemming,19, a hostess at the Native Cafe on Pensacola Beach, wears a neon green t-shirt that they sell in the restaurant that says "No drill no spill." The restaurant also sells anti-BP bumper stickers alongside their other beach souvenirs. EMILY MICHOT / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • T-shirts and bumper stickers expressing frustration with BP and oil drilling are popping up in local restaurants and shops along Pensacola Beach. Ashley Bockwith, a waitress at the Dog House Deli, was proud to purchase an anti-BP tank top and wear it to work. EMILY MICHOT / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Restaurants and shops along Pensacola Beach are beginning to sell anti-oil drilling shirts and anti-BP bumper stickers in addition to their more traditional beach souvenirs. The Native Cafe sells a "No drill no spill " shirt for $20 with proceeds benefitting animal rescue. EMILY MICHOT / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • T-shirts and bumper stickers referring to the oil spill are beginning to pop up around Pensacola Beach. Most of the oil souvenirs are anti-BP and drilling, but local artist, Ashton Howard, made a shirt with a statement more about the environment. His website states that "a portion of the proceeds will go to a local environmental group dedicated to preserving our coastal waters and keeping our beaches clean." This shirt was hanging next to corkscrews and bottle openers for sale at the Aloha Wine and Liquor store on Pensacola Beach. EMILY MICHOT / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • The Dog House Deli on Pensacola Beach keeps the money they have collected from the sale of anti-BP bumper stickers separated in the cash register drawer. They call the stack of bills their BP-sucks fund. Half of the proceeds from the bumper stickers will go to animal rescue. Emily Michot / Miami Herald Staff

  • At the Natice Cafe on Pensacola Beach anti-BP bumper stickers sit for sale on a shelf alongside the more traditional beach souvenirs. The bumper stickers are popping up in some of the small beachside restaurants and stores along Pensacola Beach as people look for a way to vent their frustration about the oil spill. The stickers cost $2 with $1 going towards animal rescue. EMILY MICHOT / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Anti-BP bumper stickers and t-shirts are beginning to pop up around Pensacola Beach as the oil crisis continues. EMILY MICHOT / MIAMI HERALD STAFF