Gulf oil spill: Day 52

  • U.S.Coast Guard Captain Steve Poulin, incident commander Coast Guard Response for Mississippi, Alabama and the Florida Panhandle, responds to Janet Ripp's request to close the Perdido Pass, at a town hall meeting at the Perdido Bay Community Center, Thursday, June 10, 2010. MARICE COHN BAND / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • About 150 concerned citizens like Janet Ripp, of Alberta, Alabama, showed up at a town meeting held the Perdido Bay Community Center, Thursday, June 10, 2010, to protect the wetlands of Florida. She asked why the Perdido Pass was not closed permanently. MARICE COHN BAND / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Workers wearing hip-boots and use nets to scoop up floating tar that has seeped into the inland waterways at Perdido Pass, Thursday, June 10, 2010, at Boggy Point boat ramp, Orange Beach, Alabama. MARICE COHN BAND / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Workers remove tar-filled bags from a public boat ramp at Boggy Point, Orange Beach, Alabama, not far from the Florida/Alabama border, Thursday, June 10, 2010. This is the first sign of oil seeping into the inland waterways at Perdido Pass. MARICE COHN BAND / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • The U.S. Coast Guard closed the boat ramp at Boggy Point, Orange Beach, Alabama, Thursday, June 10, 2010, they found tar covering the ramp. They said it was closed until they could get it cleaned properly. In the background workers have collected over 50 tar-filled bags where oil had seeped into the inland waterways and Florida's fragile wetlands. MARICE COHN BAND / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • 21 VOO's, or Vessels of Opportunity, like this cabin cruiser patrol the coast along Perdido Beach, behind it are two shrimpers used now to "skim" the oil arriving along the beach, Thursday, June 10, 2010. MARICE COHN BAND / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • A sign outside the Flora Bama bar states "Still the Worlds Most Beautiful Beaches," located on the Florida Alabama boarder, Thursday, June 10, 2010. MARICE COHN BAND / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Workers remove tar-filled bags from a public boat ramp at Boggy Point, Orange Beach, Alabama, not far from the Florida/Alabama border, Thursday, June 10, 2010. This is the first sign of oil seeping into the inland waterways and Florida's fragile wetlands, at Perdido Pass. MARICE COHN BAND / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Workers clean the boat ramp at Boggy Point, Orange Beach, Alabama, where the first large amounts of tar have seeped into the inland waterways, at Perdido Pass. They have filled over 50 bags with the floating tar. MARICE COHN BAND / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Workers open the boom, which acts like a gate at Perdido Pass, by pull the boom to an opened position it allows boaters to enter and leave the inland waterways, Thursday, June 10, 2010. Officials hope that by funneling the floating tar using the booms they have some kind of control on where it will end up inside Perdido Pass, in Orange Beach, Alabama, and keep it out of Florida's fragile wetlands. MARICE COHN BAND / MIAMI HERALD STAFF