Gulf oil spill

2 more days till BP knows if well plug try works

 

ASSOCIATED PRESS

COVINGTON, La. -- BP kept pumping heavy mud into its blown-out well beneath the Gulf of Mexico on Friday, but the company's chief executive cautioned it will be two more days before anyone knows if the latest fix attempt will end the uncontrolled flow of crude that has already become the worst oil spill in U.S. history.

BP CEO Tony Hayward had projected a resolution to the so-called "top kill" as soon as Thursday afternoon, but an 18-hour delay in the injection of heavyweight mud scuttled those plans. Though engineers had stopped pumping hours earlier, BP and coast Guard officials assured the public Thursday morning that the process was going as planned.

On Friday, Coast Guard Adm. Thad Allen said heavyweight mud was able to push down the oil and gas coming up at great force from underground, but it has not overwhelmed the gusher or stopped the flow permanently.

President Barack Obama was scheduled to head to the Gulf for a briefing a day after he acknowledged that his administration could have done a better job dealing with the spill and that it misjudged the industry's ability to handle a worst-case scenario.

"I take responsibility. It is my job to make sure that everything is done to shut this down," he said.

Friday's trip will be the president's second to the coast since the BP-leased oil rig Deepwater Horizon exploded April 20, killing 11 workers and triggering the spill.

He will be briefed in Grand Isle, La., where the public beach has been closed since globs of oil started washing up a week ago. Buggie Vegas, who owns Bridge Side Cabins and Marina there, said Obama needs to see the disaster for himself.

"I think he's going to get the message when he comes down and sees how bad it is," Vegas said.

The top kill is oil and gas giant BP PLC's latest untested bid to end a spill that has, by the most conservative estimate, surpassed the Exxon Valdez disaster by gushing more than 18 million gallons into the Gulf. It has worked on land but never been tried 5,000 feet underwater, and Hayward gave it a 60 to 70 percent chance of success.

He said Friday morning the top kill was progressing as planned and BP engineers had completed a second phase by pumping what he called "loss prevention material" into a crippled piece of equipment known as a blowout preventer to form a bridge against which crews could pump more heavyweight mud.

"Clearly I'm as anxious as everyone in America is to get this thing done," Hayward said.

BP said in a regulatory filing Friday that it has spent $930 million so far responding to the ruptured well, including costs for cleanup and prevention work, drilling relief wells, and paying grants to Gulf states, damage claims and federal costs. BP says it's too early to quantify other potential costs and liabilities associated.

Two teams of scientists calculated the well has been spewing between 504,000 and more than a million gallons a day, which in the worst-case scenario means about 39 million gallons could have leaked.

The larger figure would be nearly four times the size of the Exxon Valdez disaster, in which a tanker ran aground in Alaska in 1989, spilling nearly 11 million gallons.

The new Gulf spill estimates released Thursday were far higher than the 210,000 gallons that BP and the Coast Guard had guessed was pouring from the well.

But even the highest estimate would not make the spill the biggest ever in the Gulf. In 1979, a drilling rig in Mexican waters - the Ixtoc I - blew up, releasing 140 million gallons of oil.

Associated Press Writers Seth Borenstein, Matthew Brown, Jason Dearen, Andrew Taylor and Matthew Daly contributed to this report.

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