Gulf oil spill | The Louisiana coast

  • A dump truck with the Louisiana Army National Guard dumps rocks and dirt in the last 20 feet of Thunder pass on Elmer Island that was to be filled. The National Guard used rocks and sand to block off the Thunder Pass on Elmer Island in Grand Isle, Louisiana, to keep oil from entering the estuary. JOE RIMKUS JR. / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Captain James Hoover, with the Louisiana Army National Guard, signals for a dump truck to stop before dumping a load into the last 20 feet of Thunder pass on Elmer Island that was to be filled. The National Guard used rocks and sand to block off the Thunder Pass on Elmer Island in Grand Isle, Louisiana, to keep oil from entering the estuary. JOE RIMKUS JR. / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Captain James Hoover, with the Louisiana Army National Guard and Wayne Keller, Grand Isle Port Executive Director, survey the last 20 feet of Thunder pass on Elmers Island that was to be filled. The National Guard used rocks and sand to block off the Thunder Pass on Elmer Island in Grand Isle, Louisiana, to keep oil from entering the estuary. JOE RIMKUS JR. / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • A bull dozer with the Louisiana Army National Guard pushes dirt into the last 20 feet of Thunder pass on Elmer Island that was to be filled. The National Guard used rocks and sand to block off the Thunder Pass on Elmer Island in Grand Isle, Louisiana, to keep oil from entering the estuary. JOE RIMKUS JR. / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • A dump truck with the Louisiana Army National Guard dumps rocks and dirt in the last 20 feet of Thunder pass on Elmer Island that was to be filled.The National Guard was using rocks and sand to block off the Thunder Pass on Elmer Island in Grand Isle to keep oil from entering estuary.Grand Isle Lousiana May 19, 2010. JOE RIMKUS JR. / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • A tar ball is seen on May 19, 2010 in a bayou south of Venice, Louisiana. Heavy oil from a massive spill oozed into Louisiana's fragile marshlands as other streams of crude entered a powerful current that could sweep it to Florida, Cuba and beyond. AFP PHOTO / Clement SABOURIN (Photo credit should read Clement Sabourin/AFP/Getty Images) CLEMENT SABOURIN / COR

  • Greenpeace campainer Lindsey Allen collects samples of oil on May 19, 2010 in a bayou south of Venice, Louisiana. Heavy oil from a massive spill oozed into Louisiana's fragile marshlands as other streams of crude entered a powerful current that could sweep it to Florida, Cuba and beyond. AFP PHOTO / Clement SABOURIN (Photo credit should read Clement Sabourin/AFP/Getty Images) CLEMENT SABOURIN / COR

  • Greenpeace campainer Lindsey Allen collects samples of oil on May 19, 2010 in a bayou south of Venice, Louisiana. Heavy oil from a massive spill oozed into Louisiana's fragile marshlands as other streams of crude entered a powerful current that could sweep it to Florida, Cuba and beyond. AFP PHOTO / Clement SABOURIN (Photo credit should read Clement Sabourin/AFP/Getty Images) CLEMENT SABOURIN / COR

  • Heavy oil is seen on May 19, 2010 in a bayou south of Venice, Louisiana. A strong ocean flow known as the Loop Current is now dragging leaking crude from the giant slick off Louisiana toward Florida's popular tourist beaches and fragile coral reefs, threatening a whole new dimension to the unfolding environmental disaster. Scientists laid out a worst-case scenario in which the oceanic conveyor belt would see the first oil wash up in Florida in as little as six days, before carrying it up the US East Coast and even into the Gulf Stream. AFP PHOTO/Clement SABOURIN (Photo credit should read Clement Sabourin/AFP/Getty Images) CLEMENT SABOURIN / COR

  • Greenpeace campainer Lindsey Allen collects samples of oil on May 19, 2010 in a bayou south of Venice, Louisiana. Heavy oil from a massive spill oozed into Louisiana's fragile marshlands as other streams of crude entered a powerful current that could sweep it to Florida, Cuba and beyond. AFP PHOTO / Clement SABOURIN (Photo credit should read Clement Sabourin/AFP/Getty Images) CLEMENT SABOURIN / COR

  • Heavy oil is seen on May 19, 2010 in a bayou south of Venice, Louisiana. A strong ocean flow known as the Loop Current is now dragging leaking crude from the giant slick off Louisiana toward Florida's popular tourist beaches and fragile coral reefs, threatening a whole new dimension to the unfolding environmental disaster. Scientists laid out a worst-case scenario in which the oceanic conveyor belt would see the first oil wash up in Florida in as little as six days, before carrying it up the US East Coast and even into the Gulf Stream. AFP PHOTO/Clement SABOURIN (Photo credit should read Clement Sabourin/AFP/Getty Images) CLEMENT SABOURIN / COR

  • An oil soaked bird struggles against the side of the HOS an Iron Horse supply vessel at the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Louisiana Sunday, May 9, 2010. Gerald Herbert / AP

  • Members of the Louisiana National Guard position sand bags to prevent oil from entering the wetlands of Grand Isle and Port Fourchon, Louisiana, Monday, May 10, 2010. Carolyn Cole / MCT

  • Members of the Louisiana National Guard position sand bags to prevent oil from entering the wetlands of Grand Isle and Port Fourchon, Louisiana, Monday, May 10, 2010. Carolyn Cole / MCT

  • Members of the Louisiana National Guard position sand bags to prevent oil from entering the wetlands of Grand Isle and Port Fourchon, Louisiana, Monday, May 10, 2010. Carolyn Cole / MCT

  • A dead stingray is shown on the beach at Grand Isle, Louisiana, Monday, May 10, 2010. The National Guard is constructing a dam to prevent oil from entering the wetlands of Grand Isle and Port Fourchon. Carolyn Cole / MCT

  • A dead sea turtle is on the beach at Grand Isle, Louisiana, Monday, May 10, 2010. The National Guard is constructing a dam to prevent oil from entering the wetlands of Grand Isle and Port Fourchon. Carolyn Cole / MCT

  • A dead fish rests next to an oil boom along the shore at Grand Isle, Louisiana, Monday, May 10, 2010. The National Guard is constructing a dam to prevent oil from entering the wetlands of Grand Isle and Port Fourchon. Carolyn Cole / MCT

  • Birds fish along the coast of Grand Isle, Louisiana, Monday, May 10, 2010, where members of the Louisiana National Guard are constructing a dam to prevent oil from entering the wetlands of Grand Isle and Port Fourchon. Carolyn Cole / MCT

  • The Louisiana National Guard uses dump trucks to dam off part of the marsh on Elmer's Island in Grand Isle, La., Monday, May 10, 2010. Alex Brandon / AP

  • The contrails of an airplane are lit up by the setting sun as it climbs to a higher altitude, above left, as seen from the supply vessel Joe Griffin at the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, off the coast of Louisiana Monday, May 10, 2010. Gerald Herbert / AP

  • Boats involved in the containment efforts are seen from the bridge of the supply vessel Joe Griffin at sunset at the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Louisiana Monday, May 10, 2010. Gerald Herbert / AP

  • A cattle egret stained from oil rests on the very spot where the giant oil containment device once stood on the deck of the supply vessel Joe Griffin, at the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Louisiana. Gerald Herbert / AP

  • At Shell Beach, Louisiana, PFC Frank Messina of the Louisiana National Guard is helping in the oil spill effort. Carolyn Cole / MCT

  • An oil soaked bird struggles against the side of the HOS Iron Horse supply vessel at the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Louisiana. Gerald Herbert / AP

  • A cattle egret, right, stained from oil stands with other, slightly stained egrets, on the deck of the Joe Griffin at the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion and oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, off the coast of Louisiana. Gerald Herbert / AP

  • Oil is seen covering the water's surface while looking down from the bridge on the Joe Griffin at the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Louisiana Monday, May 10, 2010. Gerald Herbert / AP

  • A cattle egret stained from oil sits on a crew swing on the deck of the Joe Griffin at the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion and oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Louisiana. Gerald Herbert / AP

  • An oil stained cattle egret is seen on the deck of the supply vessel Joe Griffin, at the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill containment efforts in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Louisiana Sunday, May 9, 2010. Gerald Herbert / AP

  • Oil-stained cattle egrets walk on the deck of the supply vessel Joe Griffin at the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, off the coast of Louisiana Sunday, May 9, 2010. Gerald Herbert / AP

  • Oil and water, scooped up with a bucket from the Gulf of Mexico off the side of the supply vessel Joe Griffin, is seen on the hands of an Associated Press reporter at the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, off the coast of Louisiana Monday, May 10, 2010. Gerald Herbert / AP

  • A cattle egret stained from oil sits on a crew swing on the deck of the Joe Griffin at the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion and oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Louisiana. Gerald Herbert / AP

  • Oil is seen covering the water's surface while looking down from the bridge on the Joe Griffin at the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Louisiana Monday, May 10, 2010. Gerald Herbert / AP

  • Louisiana National Guard use dump trucks to dam off part of the marsh on Elmer's Island in Grand Isle, La., Monday, May 10, 2010. Oil giant BP PLC's oil rig exploded April 20, in the Gulf of Mexico killing 11 workers. It sank two days later, and oil is still pouring into the gulf. Alex Brandon / AP

  • A Louisiana National Guard dump truck dumps a load of sand in their effort to dam off part of the marsh on Elmer's Island in Grand Isle, La., Monday, May 10, 2010. Oil giant BP PLC's oil rig exploded April 20, in the Gulf of Mexico killing 11 workers. It sank two days later, and oil is still pouring into the gulf. Alex Brandon / AP