Gulf of Mexico BP oil rig explosion and spill

  • ELMER'S ISLAND, LA - MAY 25: Bags of oil collected from the beach await pickup May 25, 2010 at Elmer's Island, Louisiana. Cleanup crews had worked for days to scrub the beach and dispose of the material. As BP prepares to try and stop the oil leak with a "top kill" method, the Louisiana coastline is reeling from the effects of the continued gusher. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) JOHN MOORE / STAFF

  • PORT FOURCHON, LA - MAY 25: A dead porpoise dries as a BP cleanup crew works to remove oil from a beach on May 25, 2010 at Port Fourchon, Louisiana. As BP prepares to try and stop the oil leak with a "top kill" method, the Louisiana coastline is reeling from the effects of the continued gusher. It was not clear how the porpoise had died. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) JOHN MOORE / STAFF

  • PORT FOURCHON, LA - MAY 25: A BP cleanup crew picks up oil from a beach on May 25, 2010 at Port Fourchon, Louisiana. As BP prepares to try and stop the oil leak with a "top kill" method, the Louisiana coastline is reeling from the effects of the continued gusher. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) JOHN MOORE / STAFF

  • ELMER'S ISLAND, LA - MAY 25: "Snares" line a beach to soak up oil on May 25, 2010 at Elmer's Island, Louisiana. Cleanup crews had worked for days to scrub the beach and dispose of the oily material. As BP prepares to try and stop the oil leak with a "top kill" method, the Louisiana coastline is reeling from the effects of the continued gusher. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) JOHN MOORE / STAFF

  • ELMER'S ESLAND, LA - A sheriff's deputy rides along the oil-soaked beach as a dozer makes a road for cleanup crews on May 25, 2010 at Elmer's Island, Louisiana. As BP prepares to try and stop the oil leak with a "top kill" method, the Louisiana coastline is reeling from the effects of the continued gusher. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) JOHN MOORE / STAFF

  • GULF OF MEXICO - MAY 26: Birds take flight near an oil covered shoreline on May 26, 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico near Brush Island, Louisiana. As BP prepares to try and stop the oil leak with a 'top kill' method, the Louisiana coastline is reeling from the effects of the continued gusher. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images) WIN MCNAMEE / STAFF

  • PORT FOURCHON, LA - MAY 25: A BP cleanup crew picks up oil from a beach on May 25, 2010 at Port Fourchon, Louisiana. As BP prepares to try and stop the oil leak with a "top kill" method, the Louisiana coastline is reeling from the effects of the continued gusher. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) JOHN MOORE / STAFF

  • ELMER'S ISLAND, LA - MAY 25: A morning storm passes over the oil-soaked Gulf coast on May 25, 2010 at Elmer's Island, Louisiana. Cleanup crews had worked for days to scrub the beach and dispose of the oily material. As BP prepares to try and stop the oil leak with a "top kill" method, the Louisiana coastline is reeling from the effects of the continued gusher. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) JOHN MOORE / STAFF

  • ELMER'S ISLAND, LA - MAY 25: A broken oil boom lies in the surf on a beach on May 25, 2010 at Elmer's Island, Louisiana. Cleanup crews had worked for days trying to remove oil from beach. As BP prepares to try and stop the oil leak with a "top kill" method, the Louisiana coastline is reeling from the effects of the continued gusher. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) JOHN MOORE / STAFF

  • GULF OF MEXICO - MAY 26: Oil streaks into the Gulf of Mexico May 26, 2010 near Brush Island, Louisiana. As BP prepares to try and stop the oil leak with a 'top kill' method, the Louisiana coastline is reeling from the effects of the continued gusher. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images) WIN MCNAMEE / STAFF

  • BRUSH ISLAND, LA - MAY 26: Pelicans take flight near an oil covered shoreline on May 26, 2010 in Brush Island, Louisiana. As BP prepares to try and stop the oil leak with a 'top kill' method, the Louisiana coastline is reeling from the effects of the continued gusher. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images) WIN MCNAMEE / STAFF

  • WAVELAND, MS - MAY 05: Brian Mollere calls in to a turtle rescue team as he looks at a dead sea turtle laying on a beach as concern continues that the massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico may harm animals in its path on May 5, 2010 in Waveland, Mississippi. It is unknown if the turtle died due to the oil spill. Oil is still leaking out of the Deepwater Horizon wellhead at a estimated rate of 1,000-5,000 barrels a day. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images) JOE RAEDLE / GETTY IMAGES

  • WAVELAND, MS - MAY 05: A dead drum fish is seen laying in the surf as concern continues that the massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico may harm animals in its path on May 5, 2010 in Waveland, Mississippi. It is unknown if the fish died due to the oil spill. Oil is still leaking out of the Deepwater Horizon wellhead at a estimated rate of 1,000-5,000 barrels a day. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images) JOE RAEDLE / GETTY IMAGES

  • WAVELAND, MS - MAY 05: A dead drum fish is seen laying in the surf as concern continues that the massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico may harm animals in its path on May 5, 2010 in Waveland, Mississippi. It is unknown if the fish died due to the oil spill. Oil is still leaking out of the Deepwater Horizon wellhead at a estimated rate of 1,000-5,000 barrels a day. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images) JOE RAEDLE / GETTY IMAGES

  • WAVELAND, MS - MAY 05: A dead sea turtle is seen laying on a beach as concern continues that the massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico may harm animals in its path on May 5, 2010 in Waveland, Mississippi. It is unknown if the turtle died due to the oil spill. Oil is still leaking out of the Deepwater Horizon wellhead at a estimated rate of 1,000-5,000 barrels a day. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images) JOE RAEDLE / GETTY IMAGES

  • WAVELAND, MS - MAY 05: A dead drum fish is seen laying in the surf as concern continues that the massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico may harm animals in its path on May 5, 2010 in Waveland, Mississippi. It is unknown if the fish died due to the oil spill. Oil is still leaking out of the Deepwater Horizon wellhead at a estimated rate of 1,000-5,000 barrels a day. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images) JOE RAEDLE / STAFF

  • A dead fish is seen on the beach May 5, 2010 in Pass Christian, Mississippi as the gulf coast is still threatened by the oil spill from the BP Deepwater Horizon platform disaster. AFP PHOTO/Stan Honda (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images) STAN HONDA / GETTY IMAGES

  • Heather Neville of Tristate Bird Rescue and Research rinses off an oiled brown pelican which was captured on a barrier island off the fragile Louisiana coast on Tuesday, May 4, 2010 at a triage center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. It is just the second oiled bird to be brought to the center, which could fill beyond capacity if a massive oil slick reaches shore. An estimated 2.5 million gallons of crude have streamed into the sea since a BP-leased platform spectacularly sank in the Gulf of Mexico on April 22 and tens of thousands of birds are at risk. AFP PHOTO/BY MIRA OBERMAN (Photo credit should read MIRA OBERMAN/AFP/Getty Images) MIRA OBERMAN / COR

  • Leonard Lawton of Pass Christian, Miss., fishes next to an oil retaining boom in Bay St. Louis, Miss., Saturday, May 1, 2010. Environmentalists are concerned about the potential disaster the approaching oil slick presents. (AP Photo/Dave Martin) CHUCK COOK / FRE

  • An oiled brown pelican which was captured on a barrier island off the fragile Louisiana coast on Tuesday, May 4, 2010 is cleaned at a triage center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. It is just the second oiled bird to be brought to the center, which could fill beyond capacity if a massive oil slick reaches shore. An estimated 2.5 million gallons of crude have streamed into the sea since a BP-leased platform spectacularly sank in the Gulf of Mexico on April 22 and tens of thousands of birds are at risk. AFP PHOTO / MIRA OBERMAN (Photo credit should read MIRA OBERMAN/AFP/Getty Images) MIRA OBERMAN / COR

  • An oiled brown pelican which was captured on a barrier island off the fragile Louisiana coast on Tuesday, May 4, 2010 is cleaned at a triage center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. It is just the second oiled bird to be brought to the center, which could fill beyond capacity if a massive oil slick reaches shore. An estimated 2.5 million gallons of crude have streamed into the sea since a BP-leased platform spectacularly sank in the Gulf of Mexico on April 22 and tens of thousands of birds are at risk. AFP PHOTO / MIRA OBERMAN (Photo credit should read MIRA OBERMAN/AFP/Getty Images) MIRA OBERMAN / COR

  • The sun sets over an oil platform waiting to be towed out into the Gulf of Mexico at Port Fourchon in Louisiana, on May 4, 2010. The world will remain heavily reliant on fossil fuels for the next 40 years, Shell's chief executive said, as a massive US oil spill cast a cloud over the industry. Despite the upsurge in alternative sources, fossil fuels, including oil, natural gas and coal, will remain the dominant source for meeting increasing world energy demand until at least 2050, said chief executive Peter Voser. "Energy demand will double between now and 2050. We have currently roughly 80 percent of fossil resources delivering the energy demand today. We still see this at around 60 percent by 2050," said the chief executive of the Anglo-Dutch energy giant. His comments come as rival BP is under intense pressure over an oil spill from a platform in the Gulf of Mexico, which has given US authorities pause for thought over future drilling plans. AFP PHOTO/Mark RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images) MARK RALSTON / STAFF

  • The sun sets over an oil platform waiting to be towed out into the Gulf of Mexico at Port Fourchon in Louisiana, on May 4, 2010. The world will remain heavily reliant on fossil fuels for the next 40 years, Shell's chief executive said, as a massive US oil spill cast a cloud over the industry. Despite the upsurge in alternative sources, fossil fuels, including oil, natural gas and coal, will remain the dominant source for meeting increasing world energy demand until at least 2050, said chief executive Peter Voser. "Energy demand will double between now and 2050. We have currently roughly 80 percent of fossil resources delivering the energy demand today. We still see this at around 60 percent by 2050," said the chief executive of the Anglo-Dutch energy giant. His comments come as rival BP is under intense pressure over an oil spill from a platform in the Gulf of Mexico, which has given US authorities pause for thought over future drilling plans. AFP PHOTO/Mark RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images) MARK RALSTON / STAFF

  • The sun sets over an oil platform waiting to be towed out into the Gulf of Mexico at Port Fourchon in Louisiana, on May 4, 2010. The world will remain heavily reliant on fossil fuels for the next 40 years, Shell's chief executive said, as a massive US oil spill cast a cloud over the industry. Despite the upsurge in alternative sources, fossil fuels, including oil, natural gas and coal, will remain the dominant source for meeting increasing world energy demand until at least 2050, said chief executive Peter Voser. "Energy demand will double between now and 2050. We have currently roughly 80 percent of fossil resources delivering the energy demand today. We still see this at around 60 percent by 2050," said the chief executive of the Anglo-Dutch energy giant. His comments come as rival BP is under intense pressure over an oil spill from a platform in the Gulf of Mexico, which has given US authorities pause for thought over future drilling plans. AFP PHOTO/Mark RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images) MARK RALSTON / STAFF

  • This image released courtesy of NWF.org/OilSpill shows a turtle swimming through a massive oil slick about 15 miles south of Louisiana on May 4, 2010, spotted by officials from the National Wildlife Foundation. The group hired a boat from the port town of Venice and went out into the Gulf of Mexico through an outlet in the Mississippi River. Nobody on board was trained in animal rescue and they were forced to leave the obviously distressed turtle in the slick and simply report the coordinates to a hotline. Two weeks after the Deepwater Horizon rig exploded, the full impact of the disaster is being realized as a massive slick looms off the US Gulf coast, threatening to wipe out the livelihoods of shoreline communities. If estimates are correct, some 2.5 million gallons of crude have streamed into the sea since the BP-leased platform spectacularly sank on April 22, still ablaze more than two days after the initial blast that killed 11 workers. AFP PHOTO / NWF.org/OilSpill == RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE / NO SALES == (Photo credit should read -/AFP/Getty Images) - / HANDOUT

  • A shrimp fishing boat returns to port in Port Fourchon after the commercial fishing industry was shutdown due to spreading oil from the BP Deepwater Horizon platform disaster in Louisiana, on May 4, 2010. Louisiana's 2.4-billion-dollar a year commercial and recreational fishing industry was dealt its first major blow from the oil spill, as the US government banned activities for 10 days due to health concerns. "NOAA is restricting fishing for a minimum of ten days in federal waters most affected by the BP oil spill, largely between Louisiana state waters at the mouth of the Mississippi River to waters off Florida's Pensacola Bay. The closure is effective immediately," said the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Louisiana accounts for an estimated one-third of the country's total oyster output, and the Gulf of Mexico are prime spawning waters for fish, shrimp and crabs, as well as a major stop for migratory birds. AFP PHOTO/Mark RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images) MARK RALSTON / STAFF

  • Workers put the finishing touches on the Pollution Control Dome at the Martin Terminal worksite in Port Fourchon, as BP rushes to cap the source of the oil slick from the BP Deepwater Horizon platform disaster in Louisiana, on May 4, 2010. BP delayed until May 5 the deployment of a giant "dome" to try to contain the main leak spewing crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico. The British energy giant now plans to load the 98-ton structure onto a boat at "noon tomorrow" before shipping it out to the leak site. The dome, which is to be guided onto the largest of three oil leaks by remote-controlled submarines a mile down on the seabed, should be "operational within six days," Suttles said. Two weeks after the Deepwater Horizon rig exploded, the full impact of the disaster is being realized as a massive slick looms off the US Gulf coast, threatening to wipe out the livelihoods of shoreline communities. TOPSHOTS AFP PHOTO/Mark RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images) MARK RALSTON / STAFF

  • Oil booms that were placed in preparation of the looming oil spill from last week's collapse and spill of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig are seen strewn along the shoreline Saturday, May 1, 2010, along the South Shore south of Venice, Louisiana. Wildlife in the region is vulnerable to the looming oil spill from last week's collapse and spill of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig. (AP Photo/Eric Gay) GERALD HERBERT / STF

  • Heather Neville of Tristate Bird Rescue and Research rinses off an oiled brown pelican which was captured on a barrier island off the fragile Louisiana coast on Tuesday, May 4, 2010 at a triage center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. It is just the second oiled bird to be brought to the center, which could fill beyond capacity if a massive oil slick reaches shore. An estimated 2.5 million gallons of crude have streamed into the sea since a BP-leased platform spectacularly sank in the Gulf of Mexico on April 22 and tens of thousands of birds are at risk. AFP PHOTO/BY MIRA OBERMAN (Photo credit should read MIRA OBERMAN/AFP/Getty Images) MIRA OBERMAN / COR

  • Leonard Lawton of Pass Christian, Miss., fishes next to an oil retaining boom in Bay St. Louis, Miss., Saturday, May 1, 2010. Environmentalists are concerned about the potential disaster the approaching oil slick presents. (AP Photo/Dave Martin) CHUCK COOK / FRE

  • An oiled brown pelican which was captured on a barrier island off the fragile Louisiana coast on Tuesday, May 4, 2010 is cleaned at a triage center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. It is just the second oiled bird to be brought to the center, which could fill beyond capacity if a massive oil slick reaches shore. An estimated 2.5 million gallons of crude have streamed into the sea since a BP-leased platform spectacularly sank in the Gulf of Mexico on April 22 and tens of thousands of birds are at risk. AFP PHOTO / MIRA OBERMAN (Photo credit should read MIRA OBERMAN/AFP/Getty Images) MIRA OBERMAN / COR

  • An oiled brown pelican which was captured on a barrier island off the fragile Louisiana coast on Tuesday, May 4, 2010 is cleaned at a triage center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. It is just the second oiled bird to be brought to the center, which could fill beyond capacity if a massive oil slick reaches shore. An estimated 2.5 million gallons of crude have streamed into the sea since a BP-leased platform spectacularly sank in the Gulf of Mexico on April 22 and tens of thousands of birds are at risk. AFP PHOTO / MIRA OBERMAN (Photo credit should read MIRA OBERMAN/AFP/Getty Images) MIRA OBERMAN / COR

  • The sun sets over an oil platform waiting to be towed out into the Gulf of Mexico at Port Fourchon in Louisiana, on May 4, 2010. The world will remain heavily reliant on fossil fuels for the next 40 years, Shell's chief executive said, as a massive US oil spill cast a cloud over the industry. Despite the upsurge in alternative sources, fossil fuels, including oil, natural gas and coal, will remain the dominant source for meeting increasing world energy demand until at least 2050, said chief executive Peter Voser. "Energy demand will double between now and 2050. We have currently roughly 80 percent of fossil resources delivering the energy demand today. We still see this at around 60 percent by 2050," said the chief executive of the Anglo-Dutch energy giant. His comments come as rival BP is under intense pressure over an oil spill from a platform in the Gulf of Mexico, which has given US authorities pause for thought over future drilling plans. AFP PHOTO/Mark RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images) MARK RALSTON / STAFF

  • The sun sets over an oil platform waiting to be towed out into the Gulf of Mexico at Port Fourchon in Louisiana, on May 4, 2010. The world will remain heavily reliant on fossil fuels for the next 40 years, Shell's chief executive said, as a massive US oil spill cast a cloud over the industry. Despite the upsurge in alternative sources, fossil fuels, including oil, natural gas and coal, will remain the dominant source for meeting increasing world energy demand until at least 2050, said chief executive Peter Voser. "Energy demand will double between now and 2050. We have currently roughly 80 percent of fossil resources delivering the energy demand today. We still see this at around 60 percent by 2050," said the chief executive of the Anglo-Dutch energy giant. His comments come as rival BP is under intense pressure over an oil spill from a platform in the Gulf of Mexico, which has given US authorities pause for thought over future drilling plans. AFP PHOTO/Mark RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images) MARK RALSTON / STAFF

  • The sun sets over an oil platform waiting to be towed out into the Gulf of Mexico at Port Fourchon in Louisiana, on May 4, 2010. The world will remain heavily reliant on fossil fuels for the next 40 years, Shell's chief executive said, as a massive US oil spill cast a cloud over the industry. Despite the upsurge in alternative sources, fossil fuels, including oil, natural gas and coal, will remain the dominant source for meeting increasing world energy demand until at least 2050, said chief executive Peter Voser. "Energy demand will double between now and 2050. We have currently roughly 80 percent of fossil resources delivering the energy demand today. We still see this at around 60 percent by 2050," said the chief executive of the Anglo-Dutch energy giant. His comments come as rival BP is under intense pressure over an oil spill from a platform in the Gulf of Mexico, which has given US authorities pause for thought over future drilling plans. AFP PHOTO/Mark RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images) MARK RALSTON / STAFF

  • This image released courtesy of NWF.org/OilSpill shows a turtle swimming through a massive oil slick about 15 miles south of Louisiana on May 4, 2010, spotted by officials from the National Wildlife Foundation. The group hired a boat from the port town of Venice and went out into the Gulf of Mexico through an outlet in the Mississippi River. Nobody on board was trained in animal rescue and they were forced to leave the obviously distressed turtle in the slick and simply report the coordinates to a hotline. Two weeks after the Deepwater Horizon rig exploded, the full impact of the disaster is being realized as a massive slick looms off the US Gulf coast, threatening to wipe out the livelihoods of shoreline communities. If estimates are correct, some 2.5 million gallons of crude have streamed into the sea since the BP-leased platform spectacularly sank on April 22, still ablaze more than two days after the initial blast that killed 11 workers. AFP PHOTO / NWF.org/OilSpill == RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE / NO SALES == (Photo credit should read -/AFP/Getty Images) - / HANDOUT

  • A shrimp fishing boat returns to port in Port Fourchon after the commercial fishing industry was shutdown due to spreading oil from the BP Deepwater Horizon platform disaster in Louisiana, on May 4, 2010. Louisiana's 2.4-billion-dollar a year commercial and recreational fishing industry was dealt its first major blow from the oil spill, as the US government banned activities for 10 days due to health concerns. "NOAA is restricting fishing for a minimum of ten days in federal waters most affected by the BP oil spill, largely between Louisiana state waters at the mouth of the Mississippi River to waters off Florida's Pensacola Bay. The closure is effective immediately," said the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Louisiana accounts for an estimated one-third of the country's total oyster output, and the Gulf of Mexico are prime spawning waters for fish, shrimp and crabs, as well as a major stop for migratory birds. AFP PHOTO/Mark RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images) MARK RALSTON / STAFF

  • Workers put the finishing touches on the Pollution Control Dome at the Martin Terminal worksite in Port Fourchon, as BP rushes to cap the source of the oil slick from the BP Deepwater Horizon platform disaster in Louisiana, on May 4, 2010. BP delayed until May 5 the deployment of a giant "dome" to try to contain the main leak spewing crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico. The British energy giant now plans to load the 98-ton structure onto a boat at "noon tomorrow" before shipping it out to the leak site. The dome, which is to be guided onto the largest of three oil leaks by remote-controlled submarines a mile down on the seabed, should be "operational within six days," Suttles said. Two weeks after the Deepwater Horizon rig exploded, the full impact of the disaster is being realized as a massive slick looms off the US Gulf coast, threatening to wipe out the livelihoods of shoreline communities. TOPSHOTS AFP PHOTO/Mark RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images) MARK RALSTON / STAFF

  • Oil booms that were placed in preparation of the looming oil spill from last week's collapse and spill of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig are seen strewn along the shoreline Saturday, May 1, 2010, along the South Shore south of Venice, Louisiana. Wildlife in the region is vulnerable to the looming oil spill from last week's collapse and spill of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig. (AP Photo/Eric Gay) GERALD HERBERT / STF

  • Heather Neville of Tristate Bird Rescue and Research rinses off an oiled brown pelican which was captured on a barrier island off the fragile Louisiana coast on Tuesday, May 4, 2010 at a triage center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. It is just the second oiled bird to be brought to the center, which could fill beyond capacity if a massive oil slick reaches shore. An estimated 2.5 million gallons of crude have streamed into the sea since a BP-leased platform spectacularly sank in the Gulf of Mexico on April 22 and tens of thousands of birds are at risk. AFP PHOTO/BY MIRA OBERMAN (Photo credit should read MIRA OBERMAN/AFP/Getty Images) MIRA OBERMAN / COR

  • Leonard Lawton of Pass Christian, Miss., fishes next to an oil retaining boom in Bay St. Louis, Miss., Saturday, May 1, 2010. Environmentalists are concerned about the potential disaster the approaching oil slick presents. (AP Photo/Dave Martin) CHUCK COOK / FRE

  • An oiled brown pelican which was captured on a barrier island off the fragile Louisiana coast on Tuesday, May 4, 2010 is cleaned at a triage center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. It is just the second oiled bird to be brought to the center, which could fill beyond capacity if a massive oil slick reaches shore. An estimated 2.5 million gallons of crude have streamed into the sea since a BP-leased platform spectacularly sank in the Gulf of Mexico on April 22 and tens of thousands of birds are at risk. AFP PHOTO / MIRA OBERMAN (Photo credit should read MIRA OBERMAN/AFP/Getty Images) MIRA OBERMAN / COR

  • An oiled brown pelican which was captured on a barrier island off the fragile Louisiana coast on Tuesday, May 4, 2010 is cleaned at a triage center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. It is just the second oiled bird to be brought to the center, which could fill beyond capacity if a massive oil slick reaches shore. An estimated 2.5 million gallons of crude have streamed into the sea since a BP-leased platform spectacularly sank in the Gulf of Mexico on April 22 and tens of thousands of birds are at risk. AFP PHOTO / MIRA OBERMAN (Photo credit should read MIRA OBERMAN/AFP/Getty Images) MIRA OBERMAN / COR

  • The sun sets over an oil platform waiting to be towed out into the Gulf of Mexico at Port Fourchon in Louisiana, on May 4, 2010. The world will remain heavily reliant on fossil fuels for the next 40 years, Shell's chief executive said, as a massive US oil spill cast a cloud over the industry. Despite the upsurge in alternative sources, fossil fuels, including oil, natural gas and coal, will remain the dominant source for meeting increasing world energy demand until at least 2050, said chief executive Peter Voser. "Energy demand will double between now and 2050. We have currently roughly 80 percent of fossil resources delivering the energy demand today. We still see this at around 60 percent by 2050," said the chief executive of the Anglo-Dutch energy giant. His comments come as rival BP is under intense pressure over an oil spill from a platform in the Gulf of Mexico, which has given US authorities pause for thought over future drilling plans. AFP PHOTO/Mark RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images) MARK RALSTON / STAFF

  • The sun sets over an oil platform waiting to be towed out into the Gulf of Mexico at Port Fourchon in Louisiana, on May 4, 2010. The world will remain heavily reliant on fossil fuels for the next 40 years, Shell's chief executive said, as a massive US oil spill cast a cloud over the industry. Despite the upsurge in alternative sources, fossil fuels, including oil, natural gas and coal, will remain the dominant source for meeting increasing world energy demand until at least 2050, said chief executive Peter Voser. "Energy demand will double between now and 2050. We have currently roughly 80 percent of fossil resources delivering the energy demand today. We still see this at around 60 percent by 2050," said the chief executive of the Anglo-Dutch energy giant. His comments come as rival BP is under intense pressure over an oil spill from a platform in the Gulf of Mexico, which has given US authorities pause for thought over future drilling plans. AFP PHOTO/Mark RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images) MARK RALSTON / STAFF

  • The sun sets over an oil platform waiting to be towed out into the Gulf of Mexico at Port Fourchon in Louisiana, on May 4, 2010. The world will remain heavily reliant on fossil fuels for the next 40 years, Shell's chief executive said, as a massive US oil spill cast a cloud over the industry. Despite the upsurge in alternative sources, fossil fuels, including oil, natural gas and coal, will remain the dominant source for meeting increasing world energy demand until at least 2050, said chief executive Peter Voser. "Energy demand will double between now and 2050. We have currently roughly 80 percent of fossil resources delivering the energy demand today. We still see this at around 60 percent by 2050," said the chief executive of the Anglo-Dutch energy giant. His comments come as rival BP is under intense pressure over an oil spill from a platform in the Gulf of Mexico, which has given US authorities pause for thought over future drilling plans. AFP PHOTO/Mark RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images) MARK RALSTON / STAFF

  • This image released courtesy of NWF.org/OilSpill shows a turtle swimming through a massive oil slick about 15 miles south of Louisiana on May 4, 2010, spotted by officials from the National Wildlife Foundation. The group hired a boat from the port town of Venice and went out into the Gulf of Mexico through an outlet in the Mississippi River. Nobody on board was trained in animal rescue and they were forced to leave the obviously distressed turtle in the slick and simply report the coordinates to a hotline. Two weeks after the Deepwater Horizon rig exploded, the full impact of the disaster is being realized as a massive slick looms off the US Gulf coast, threatening to wipe out the livelihoods of shoreline communities. If estimates are correct, some 2.5 million gallons of crude have streamed into the sea since the BP-leased platform spectacularly sank on April 22, still ablaze more than two days after the initial blast that killed 11 workers. AFP PHOTO / NWF.org/OilSpill == RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE / NO SALES == (Photo credit should read -/AFP/Getty Images) - / HANDOUT

  • A shrimp fishing boat returns to port in Port Fourchon after the commercial fishing industry was shutdown due to spreading oil from the BP Deepwater Horizon platform disaster in Louisiana, on May 4, 2010. Louisiana's 2.4-billion-dollar a year commercial and recreational fishing industry was dealt its first major blow from the oil spill, as the US government banned activities for 10 days due to health concerns. "NOAA is restricting fishing for a minimum of ten days in federal waters most affected by the BP oil spill, largely between Louisiana state waters at the mouth of the Mississippi River to waters off Florida's Pensacola Bay. The closure is effective immediately," said the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Louisiana accounts for an estimated one-third of the country's total oyster output, and the Gulf of Mexico are prime spawning waters for fish, shrimp and crabs, as well as a major stop for migratory birds. AFP PHOTO/Mark RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images) MARK RALSTON / STAFF

  • Workers put the finishing touches on the Pollution Control Dome at the Martin Terminal worksite in Port Fourchon, as BP rushes to cap the source of the oil slick from the BP Deepwater Horizon platform disaster in Louisiana, on May 4, 2010. BP delayed until May 5 the deployment of a giant "dome" to try to contain the main leak spewing crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico. The British energy giant now plans to load the 98-ton structure onto a boat at "noon tomorrow" before shipping it out to the leak site. The dome, which is to be guided onto the largest of three oil leaks by remote-controlled submarines a mile down on the seabed, should be "operational within six days," Suttles said. Two weeks after the Deepwater Horizon rig exploded, the full impact of the disaster is being realized as a massive slick looms off the US Gulf coast, threatening to wipe out the livelihoods of shoreline communities. TOPSHOTS AFP PHOTO/Mark RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images) MARK RALSTON / STAFF

  • Oil booms that were placed in preparation of the looming oil spill from last week's collapse and spill of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig are seen strewn along the shoreline Saturday, May 1, 2010, along the South Shore south of Venice, Louisiana. Wildlife in the region is vulnerable to the looming oil spill from last week's collapse and spill of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig. (AP Photo/Eric Gay) GERALD HERBERT / STF

  • Thad W. Allen, Commandant US Coast Guard, speaks about the crude oil leaking from the sea floor 50 miles off the gulf coast over a map and said that if the well head was not sealed off and the 1000 barrels a day that is leaking continues it could become worse than the Valdes oilspill in Alaska. An oil drilling rig exploded and sank in 5,000 feet of water off the La. coast and now some of the oil is only about 20 miles off the coast. Allen was talking to The Miami Herald editorial board Wed, April 29, 2010. TIM CHAPMAN / TIM CHAPMAN

  • Thad W. Allen, Commandant US Coast Guard, speaks about the crude oil leaking from the sea floor 50 miles off the gulf coast and said that if the well head was not sealed off and the 1000 barrels a day that is leaking continues it could become worse than the Valdes oilspill in Alaska. An oil drilling rig exploded and sank in 5,000 feet of water off the La. coast and now some of the oil is only about 20 miles off the coast. Allen was talking to The Miami Herald editorial board Wed, April 29, 2010. TIM CHAPMAN / TIM CHAPMAN

  • Handout photo provided by Greenpeace on April 29, 2010 shows birds flying over a band of oil in this view of the Gulf of Mexico, south of Louisiana, where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread on April 28. SEAN GARDNER/GREEN PEACE

  • Oil booms that were placed in preparation of the looming oil spill from last week's collapse and spill of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig are seen strewn along the shoreline Saturday, May 1, 2010, along the South Shore south of Venice, Louisiana. Wildlife in the region is vulnerable to the looming oil spill from last week's collapse and spill of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig. (AP Photo/Eric Gay) GERALD HERBERT / STF

  • This May 3, 2010 US Coast Guard handout image shows Shrimp boats towing a fire-resistant oil-containment boom as their crews conduct in situ burn training off the coast of Venice, La., May 3, 2010. The training is designed to help the local fisherman prepare to assist with possible future in situ burn operations. AFP PHOTO/HO/US COAST GUARD/ Petty Officer 3rd Class Patrick Kelley == RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN == (Photo credit should read HO/AFP/Getty Images) HO / HANDOUT

  • A Monday, May 3, 2010 photo provided by Richard J. Arsenault shows oil slick on the ocean surface near the Chandeleur Barrier Island Chain off the coast of Louisiana, seen in background. FRANK L. WILLIS/AP

  • Oil booms are seen off shore as Brown pelicans nest on Breton Island of the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Lousiana Tuesday. Wildlife are vulnerable to the oil spill resulting from last week's explosion and sinking of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig. GERALD HERBERT/AP

  • Handout photo provided by Greenpeace on April 29, 2010 shows a ship working on containing the oil on the surface of the water in the Gulf of Mexico, south of Louisiana, where oil leaking from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead continues to spread on April 28. SEAN GARDNER/GREEN PEACE

  • NEW ORLEANS - APRIL 28: A boat works to collect oil that has leaked from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead in the Gulf of Mexico on April 28, 2010 near New Orleans, Louisiana. An estimated leak of 1,000 barrels of oil a day are still leaking into the gulf. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images) CHRIS GRAYTHEN / STAFF

  • NEW ORLEANS - APRIL 28: A boat works to collect oil that has leaked from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead in the Gulf of Mexico on April 28, 2010 near New Orleans, Louisiana. An estimated leak of 1,000 barrels of oil a day are still leaking into the gulf. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images) CHRIS GRAYTHEN / STAFF

  • NEW ORLEANS - APRIL 28: An oil rig near the Deepwater Horizon wellhead in the Gulf of Mexico on April 28, 2010 near New Orleans, Louisiana. An estimated leak of 1,000 barrels of oil a day are still leaking into the gulf. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images) CHRIS GRAYTHEN / STAFF

  • NEW ORLEANS - APRIL 28: A boat makes its way through crude oil that has leaked from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead in the Gulf of Mexico on April 28, 2010 near New Orleans, Louisiana. An estimated leak of 1,000 barrels of oil a day are still leaking into the gulf. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images) CHRIS GRAYTHEN / STAFF

  • NEW ORLEANS - APRIL 28: Crude oil sits on the surface of the water that has leaked from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead in the Gulf of Mexico on April 28, 2010 near New Orleans, Louisiana. An estimated leak of 1,000 barrels of oil a day are still leaking into the gulf. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images) CHRIS GRAYTHEN / STAFF

  • NEW ORLEANS - APRIL 28: Crude oil sits on the surface of the water that has leaked from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead in the Gulf of Mexico on April 28, 2010 near New Orleans, Louisiana. An estimated leak of 1,000 barrels of oil a day are still leaking into the gulf. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images) CHRIS GRAYTHEN / STAFF

  • NEW ORLEANS - APRIL 28: A boat makes its way through crude oil that has leaked from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead in the Gulf of Mexico on April 28, 2010 near New Orleans, Louisiana. An estimated leak of 1,000 barrels of oil a day are still leaking into the gulf. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images) CHRIS GRAYTHEN / STAFF

  • NEW ORLEANS - APRIL 28: A boat makes its way through crude oil that has leaked from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead in the Gulf of Mexico on April 28, 2010 near New Orleans, Louisiana. An estimated leak of 1,000 barrels of oil a day are still leaking into the gulf. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images) CHRIS GRAYTHEN / STAFF

  • NEW ORLEANS - APRIL 28: A boat makes its way through crude oil that has leaked from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead in the Gulf of Mexico on April 28, 2010 near New Orleans, Louisiana. An estimated leak of 1,000 barrels of oil a day are still leaking into the gulf. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images) CHRIS GRAYTHEN / STAFF

  • NEW ORLEANS - APRIL 28: A boat makes its way through crude oil that has leaked from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead in the Gulf of Mexico on April 28, 2010 near New Orleans, Louisiana. An estimated leak of 1,000 barrels of oil a day are still leaking into the gulf. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images) CHRIS GRAYTHEN / STAFF

  • NEW ORLEANS - APRIL 28: Crude oil sits on the surface of the water that has leaked from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead in the Gulf of Mexico on April 28, 2010 near New Orleans, Louisiana. An estimated leak of 1,000 barrels of oil a day are still leaking into the gulf. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images) CHRIS GRAYTHEN / STAFF

  • NEW ORLEANS - APRIL 28: Crude oil sits on the surface of the water that has leaked from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead in the Gulf of Mexico on April 28, 2010 near New Orleans, Louisiana. An estimated leak of 1,000 barrels of oil a day are still leaking into the gulf. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images) CHRIS GRAYTHEN / STAFF

  • NEW ORLEANS - APRIL 28: A boat makes its way through crude oil that has leaked from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead in the Gulf of Mexico on April 28, 2010 near New Orleans, Louisiana. An estimated leak of 1,000 barrels of oil a day are still leaking into the gulf. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images) CHRIS GRAYTHEN / STAFF

  • NEW ORLEANS - APRIL 28: A boat makes its way through crude oil that has leaked from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead in the Gulf of Mexico on April 28, 2010 near New Orleans, Louisiana. An estimated leak of 1,000 barrels of oil a day are still leaking into the gulf. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images) CHRIS GRAYTHEN / STAFF

  • NEW ORLEANS - APRIL 28: A boat works to collect oil that has leaked from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead in the Gulf of Mexico on April 28, 2010 near New Orleans, Louisiana. An estimated leak of 1,000 barrels of oil a day are still leaking into the gulf. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images) CHRIS GRAYTHEN / STAFF

  • An image acquired April 28, 2010 by the NASA Earth Observatory shows the Gulf Coast and near-shore waters. HAND OUT

  • An April 25, 2010 satellite photo provided Tuesday by NASA shows the oil slick from the 42,000 gallon-a-day oil leak from a well in the Gulf of Mexico following and explosion at the the Deepwater Horizon platform on April 20. NASA/AP

  • In this aerial photo taken in the Gulf of Mexico weathered oil is seen near the coast of Louisiana from a leaking pipeline that resulted from last week's explosion and collapse of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig Monday. GERALD HERBERT/AP

  • An April 25, 2010 satellite photo provided by NASA shows a portion of the slick, with ships visible at bottom of the frame, from the 42,000 gallon-a-day oil leak from a well in the Gulf of Mexico following and explosion at the the Deepwater Horizon platform on April 20. NASA/AP

  • A star fish washes ashore on the Chandeleur Islands, home of the Breton National Wildlife Refuge, off the coast of southeastern Lousiana Tuesday. GERALD HERBERT/AP

  • A starfish washes ashore on the Chandeleur Islands, home of the Breton National Wildlife Refuge, off the Southeastern coast of Lousiana Tuesday. The barrier islands are at risk from a growing oil spill and leak in the Gulf of Mexico caused by the explosion and sinking of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig last week. GERALD HERBERT/ / AP

  • Two ships float near in a massive oil slick spreading in the Gulf of Mexico after the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig exploded off the coast of Louisiana. Florida Gov. Charlie Crist flew above the plume on Tuesday, from Mobile, Ala. BRENDAN FARRINGTON/AP

  • Weathered oil is seen in the wake of a crew boat as it sails over the site of a leaking oil pipeline that resulted from last week's explosion and collapse of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico near the coast of Louisiana Tuesday. PATRICK SEMANSKY/AP / AP

  • In this aerial photo taken in the Gulf of Mexico more than 50 miles southeast of Venice on Louisiana's tip, an oil slick is seen as the Deepwater Horizon oil rig burns Wednesday, April 21, 2010. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert) ALEX BRANDON / HO

  • In this aerial photo taken in the Gulf of Mexico more than 50 miles southeast of Venice on Louisiana's tip, the Deepwater Horizon oil rig is seen burning Wednesday, April 21, 2010. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert) ALEX BRANDON / HO

  • In this image released by the US Coast Guard (USCG), a Coast Guard MH-65C dolphin rescue helicopter and crew document the fire aboard the mobile offshore drilling unit Deepwater Horizon, while searching for survivors April 21, 2010. Multiple Coast Guard helicopters, planes and cutters responded to rescue the Deepwater Horizons 126 person crew. Rescuers were searching Wednesday in the Gulf of Mexico for 11 or 12 workers who went missing in the overnight oil rig explosion. AFP PHOTO/USCG/Petty Officer 2nd Class Scott Lloyd = RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE = NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN = (Photo credit should read Scott Lloyd/AFP/Getty Images) SCOTT LLOYD / HANDOUT

  • GULF OF MEXICO - APRIL 21: Fire boats battle a fire n off shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon April 21, 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Louisiana. Multiple Coast Guard helicopters, planes and cutters responded to rescue the Deepwater Horizons 126 person crew after an explosion and fire caused the crew to evacuate. (Photo by U.S. Coast Guard via Getty Images) U.S. COAST GUARD / HANDOUT

  • GULF OF MEXICO - APRIL 21: Fire boats battle a fire at the off shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon April 21, 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Louisiana. Multiple Coast Guard helicopters, planes and cutters responded to rescue the Deepwater Horizons 126 person crew after an explosion and fire caused the crew to evacuate. (Photo by U.S. Coast Guard via Getty Images) U.S. COAST GUARD / HANDOUT

  • GULF OF MEXICO - APRIL 21: Fire boats battle a fire at the off shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon April 21, 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Louisiana. Multiple Coast Guard helicopters, planes and cutters responded to rescue the Deepwater Horizons 126 person crew after an explosion and fire caused the crew to evacuate. (Photo by U.S. Coast Guard via Getty Images) U.S. COAST GUARD / HANDOUT

  • In this aerial photo taken in the Gulf of Mexico more than 50 miles southeast of Venice on Louisiana's tip, the Deepwater Horizon oil rig is seen burning Wednesday, April 21, 2010. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert) PATRICK SEMANSKY / FRE

  • Fire boats battle a fire at the off shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon Thursday in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Louisiana. Multiple Coast Guard helicopters, planes and cutters responded to rescue the Deepwater Horizons 126 person crew after an explosion and fire caused the crew to evacuate. U.S. COAST GUARD/GETTY IMAGES

  • The off shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon burns in the Gulf of Mexico April 21, 2010. A huge oil slick remained offshore and largely stationary today, May 4, 2010, in a development that should help cleanup efforts. (Photo courtesy Jon T. Fritz/MCT) ASTRID REICKEN / STR

  • The off shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon burns in the Gulf of Mexico April 21, 2010. A huge oil slick remained offshore and largely stationary today, May 4, 2010, in a development that should help cleanup efforts. (Photo courtesy Jon T. Fritz/MCT) JON T. FRITZ / MBR

  • Thad W. Allen, Commandant US Coast Guard, (fourth from left),speaks about the crude oil leaking from the sea floor 50 miles off the gulf coast over a map and said that if the well head was not sealed off and the 1000 barrels a day that is leaking continues it could become worse than the Valdes oilspill in Alaska. An oil drilling rig exploded and sank in 5,000 feet of water off the La. coast and now some of the oil is only about 20 miles off the coast. Allen was talking to The Miami Herald editorial board Wed, April 29, 2010. TIM CHAPMAN / TIM CHAPMAN

  • GULF OF MEXICO - APRIL 21: Fire boats battle a fire at the off shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon April 21, 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Louisiana. Multiple Coast Guard helicopters, planes and cutters responded to rescue the Deepwater Horizons 126 person crew after an explosion and fire caused the crew to evacuate. (Photo by U.S. Coast Guard via Getty Images) U.S. COAST GUARD / HANDOUT