Miami Beach

Stop! Click! Red light cameras go live in Miami Beach

 

Did we really have to file our taxes and start getting our license plates photographed by red light cameras on the same day?

Thursday, April 15, was the official start for enforcement (translate that to FINES) of Miami Beach’s red light camera initiative. If the cameras get you, you’ll never know — until the notice of violation and fine comes in the mail. The notice will get your attention: $125 a pop.

The closest intersection to Belle Isle affects drivers headed westbound on Alton at 17th Street.

Here’s Miami Beach’s explanation of how it works:

The camera system only photographs a vehicle if it enters the intersection after the light has turned red. A second photograph is taken as the vehicle progresses through the intersection.

Vehicles that enter intersection on a yellow light phase are not photographed; even if they are still in the intersection when the light changes to the red phases. The technology is designed to record motorists as they enter an intersection after the signal turns red.

The camera photographs the vehicle from the rear – not the driver. The camera records the date time, lane, location, and speed of the vehicle.

Here is a list of the intersections:

* Washington Ave. at 17th St. – Eastbound

* Washington Ave at 17th St. – Southbound

* Chase Ave. and Alton Rd. – Northbound

* 63rd St. and Indian Creek Dr. – Southbound

* 41st St. and Prairie Ave. – Northbound

* 71st St. and Indian Creek Dr. – Northbound

* Dade Blvd. and 23rd St. – Westbound

* Alton Rd. and 17th St. – Westbound

* Washington Ave. and Dade Blvd. – Eastbound

Read more Miami Beach stories from the Miami Herald

Miami Herald

Join the
Discussion

The Miami Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

The Miami Herald uses Facebook's commenting system. You need to log in with a Facebook account in order to comment. If you have questions about commenting with your Facebook account, click here.

Have a news tip? You can send it anonymously. Click here to send us your tip - or - consider joining the Public Insight Network and become a source for The Miami Herald and el Nuevo Herald.

Hide Comments

This affects comments on all stories.

Cancel OK