Haiti

After the earthquake

Haiti: Photographer Al Diaz Haiti: Photographer Carl Juste Haiti: Photographer Patrick Farrell MiamiHerald.com

Feb. 16: Earthquake aftermath in Haiti

  • A man brandishes a knife during a fight over looted goods in Port-au-Prince, Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2010. Sporadic looting has erupted since the Jan. 12 earthquake struck Haiti. Javier Galeano / AP

  • United Nations armored vehicles patrol the earthquake damaged streets of downtown Port-au-Prince, Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2010. Javier Galeano / AP

  • Soldiers of Japan's Self-Defense Forces watch the activities at the MINUSTAH (United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti) base in Port-au-Prince, Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2010. Japan has sent a 350 personnel engineering unit to the quake-devastated Caribbean nation that is expected to remove rubble and repair roads. Dario Lopez-Mills / AP

  • A soldier of Japan's Self-Defense Forces directs a bulldozer at the MINUSTAH (United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti) base in Port-au-Prince, Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2010. Japan is sending a 350 personnel engineering unit to the quake-devastated Caribbean nation that is expected to remove rubble and repair roads. Dario Lopez-Mills / AP

  • A makeshift hardware store is open for business on the site where it once stood before the Jan. 12 earthquake leveled it in downtown Port-au-Prince, Tuesday Feb. 16, 2010. Dario Lopez-Mills / AP

  • Looters run out with goods from an earthquake destroyed store in Port-au-Prince, Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2010. Sporadic looting has erupted since the Jan. 12 earthquake struck Haiti. Javier Galeano / AP

  • Yolinda Bethermy, 1, sits in a camp in the Martissant section of Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Shadows of her mother and sisters are cast against the wall where she and her family sleeps. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • One-year-old Yolinda Bethermy suffers from malnutrition and is the youngest of four children. Her family is now living in a camp where food is scarce. The shadows of her mother and others are cast against the wall where she and her family sleeps. Earthquake refugees have gathered in a camp in the Martissant section of Port-au-Prince, Haiti. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • One-year-old Yolinda Bethermy's mother swats flies off of her face as her younger sister, Fabiana, naps. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • One-year-old Yolinda Bethermy's older sister, Rosedaline, 3, wipes her nose. Her family is now living in a camp where food is scarce. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Earthquake survivors Wedler Clemond, right, and McKeen King play basketball near their destroyed homes in Leogane, Haiti. Leogane is located near the epicenter of the earthquake. More than 200,000 people were estimated killed in the earthquake. A month after the disaster, a resilient populace carries on, despite lacking many basic necessities, such as tents for temporary shelter. Mario Tama / Getty Images

  • A girl living in the Foyer de la Patience des Infantes orphanage looks in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Many children in orphanages actually have parents who are too poor to care for them and have placed them in the care of the orphanages. Child-smuggling was a problem in Haiti even before the earthquake, with thousands of children disappearing every year. Ten Americans were arrested while attempting to transport 33 Haitian children across the border to the Dominican Republic. Mario Tama / Getty Images

  • A crowd gathers around the body of a woman who was struck by a truck that plowed through a crowd killing at least one and injuring at least ten people during the early morning rush hour. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • A young woman folds the blankets as habitants of the camp start their day. Earthquake refugees have gathered in a camp in the Martissant section of Port-au-Prince, Haiti. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Rosecama Gosial, 2, is placed down on the floor. Rosecama has lost her sight due to malnutrition. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Rosecama Gosial, 2, cries after being placed on the floor and begins to cry. Rosecama has lost her sight due to malnutrition. Earthquake refugees have gathered in a camp in the Martissant section of Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Some children are suffering from severe malnutrition due to the lack of food. The U.S. is considering reducing its relief effort due to the demands and cost of running such an operation while fighting two wars. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Yolinda Bethermy, 1, left, suffers from malnutrition. Her older sister, Rosedaline, 3, center, playfully tries to wake her four-month-old sister, Fabiana. Her family is now living in a camp where food is scarce. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • A young woman folds the blankets as habitants of the camp start their day. Earthquake refugees have gathered in a camp in the Martissant section of Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Some children are suffering from severe malnutrition due to the lack of food. The U.S. is considering reducing its relief effort due to the demands and cost of running such an operation while fighting two wars. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Men suspected of looting are taken away by police in dowtown Port-au-Prince, Tuesday Feb. 16, 2010. Sporadic looting erupted in Haiti since the Jan. 12 earthquake struck the country. Javier Galeano / AP

  • A man involved in a street fight is taken away by Haitian police in earthquake-torn Port-au-Prince, Tuesday Feb. 16, 2010. Javier Galeano / AP

  • Members of the local Haitian fire department work with U.S. Special Operations service members to dig for missing children at the La Petite Ecole school in Cap-Haitien, which was hit with a mudslide Feb. 15. The U.S. Special Operations members are in Cap-Haitien to help facilitate humanitarian support efforts after the devastating Jan. 12 earthquake hit Haiti. Tech. Sgt. Victoria Meyer / U.S. Air Force

  • A sign points the area where thousands of earthquake victims are buried. Mass graves dug by a back hoe and sealed with help of a bulldozer are part of the government's hard answer for disposal of the many unnamed victims of Haiti's worst earthquake in two hundreds years. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • Mass graves dug by a back hoe and sealed with help of a bulldozer are part of the government's hard answer for disposal of the many unnamed victims of Haiti's worst earthquake in two hundreds years. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • The leg of a earthquake victims dangles off the edge. The victim was nearly out of danger but the roof fell on top of him. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

  • A cow grazes near a small grave of three earthquake victims at second site near a makeshift cemetery. Mass graves dug by a back hoe and sealed with help of a bulldozer are part of the government's hard answer for disposal of the many unnamed victims of Haiti's worst earthquake in two hundreds years. CARL JUSTE / MIAMI HERALD STAFF